All Posts tagged www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

Good fat, whole milk & CLA

Trans…Fatty…Acids 

For years we’ve heard warnings about the dangers of trans fatty acids. 
One little-known trans fat called trans-palmitoleic acid (TPA), which accounts for only 0.2 percent of dairy fats, appears to yield some pretty impressive heart-health benefits. 

A research team at Harvard examined dietary records and blood samples for more than 3,700 older adults who participated in the Cardiovascular Health Study, they found that the subjects who had the highest levels of TPA also had:

  • Less body fat
  • Lower C-reactive protein
  • Lower triglycerides
  • Higher HDL cholesterol

Those with the highest TPA levels were THREE TIMES less likely to develop type 2 diabetes compared to subjects with the lowest TPA levels!

Three times! 

I’m thinking raw organic whole milk here. It contains TPA saturated fats. 

Not to worry about the fat (I keep telling you it’s the carbs we need to get off)…this quote appeared in the Archives of Internal Medicine, July 1992 regarding the famous Farmingham Study: “At Framingham, we found that the people who ate the most saturated fat, the most cholesterol and the most calories weighed the least, were more physically active and had the lowest serum cholesterol levels.” 

Don’t drink  skim milk,  the skimming process makes the nutrients in milk (such as calcium) more difficult to absorb. You don’t want that. And secondly, TPA gets skimmed right off in the skimming process. 

For raw milk, you’ll have to go off the commercial grid to find a local dairy farmer who sells unpasteurized, unhomogenized milk. And for your extra effort, you’ll be richly rewarded with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)–an essential fatty acid that’s abundant in raw milk, but not commercial milk.

CLA has been shown to help reduce abdominal fat, reduce progression of osteoporosis, and boost the immune system while lowering triglycerides and diabetes risk. I recommed Ultra CLA from Metagenics. It has 1,000 mg/2 softgel tablets. www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com 

I often recommend Ultra CLA to my female clients that want to remove belly fat!

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Type 2 diabetics & diet

I have a lot of  Type 2 diabetic patients who are looking for ways to control it better. I have seen consistently good results with  low-carb Paleo diets.

I hear lots of  stories from patients who have total cholesterol around 200 – 250. There GP doctors want them to go on cholesterol lowering meds. I am not in favor of this because from what I read, higher cholesterol is associated with increased longevity (lowest all-cause mortality and not just on cardiovascular mortality) especially in women.

People need to understand that cholesterol doesn’t cause heart disease; inflammation does and this is how statins, when they work, work. When I get clients on an anti-inflammatory diet (no sugar, grains, legumes,  and  the right oils) and using UltraInflamX or UltraMeal by Metagenics  it simply allows the body to go back to its natural, non-inflammatory state.

There are some pretty powerful statements made about this topic such as the ASCOT study, the largest randomized clinical study of statin effectiveness in women, found that the women who took Lipitor, developed more heart attacks than women in the group given placebo.  In this ASCOT study, 2,000 women were included among 10,000 patients having elevated blood pressure and at least three other cardiovascular risk factors.

Statins have only been shown statistically beneficial to men who have had a previous coronary event (statins reduce the rate of subsequent events).  This is why I’m still a believer in using UltraInflamX or UltraMeal along with diet recommendations.

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Anti-oxidants & brain function

All my friends know I just had a birthday. We are all aware that our mental functions slow down as we age. Our focus weakens and we lose memory. One reason is because oxidative stress. That’s why you hear so much about taking  ‘anti’-oxidants. These may help slow or even halt the aging  damage. 

Store-bought organic berries are a great source. Studies show that blueberries increase health and enhance cognitive function in aging.  So make sure you add fresh blueberries to your breakfast protein shake (UltraMeal from Metagenics).

Mental decline is caused by oxidative stress or free radical damage to the brain. According to Dr. James A. Joseph, an expert on cognitive decline, “Ample research indicates that age-related neuronal decrements are the result of oxidative stress.” He says  “Oxidative stress and inflammation are the evil twins of brain aging.”

In 1999, Dr. Joseph published a landmark study on the subject in the Journal of Neuroscience. His study suggested that blueberries may hold the key to reversing mental aging. Dr. Joseph took four groups of rats and fed them a normal diet. Three of the groups were given strawberry, spinach, or blueberry extracts. Over the course of 8 weeks, he tested the rats for coordination and mental functioning. The blueberry group performed best on the coordination tests. This group also showed improved neuron functioning. His research led him to nickname blueberries “brainberries.” 

I’m big on anything that lowers inflammation and blueberries also function as anti-inflammatory agent to protect brain integrity. 

Blueberries are best eaten with other foods that contain fats. At the top of the list are walnuts and avocado. Walnuts are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. That makes blueberries and walnuts a powerful combination. These foods promote youthful flexibility in brain cell membranes.

“Polyphenols in berries and fatty acids in walnuts fluidize the cell membrane,” says Dr. Joseph. 

Walnuts block disease-causing inflammation in our cells. Recent research links inflammation to cognitive decline, so reducing inflammation is important to promote better mental function.

People who eat breakfast are more mentally alert. They remember more, react quicker, and are more creative. This first meal delivers fuel to the brain after fasting all night. That’s way I recommend a the UltraMeal protein shake first thing in the morning. I know you are busy and often skip breakfast – a shake takes one minute to make.

As an afternoon snack, try a handful of blackberries and mix them with almonds. Enjoy green tea – it has lots of antioxidants. Enjoy strawberries and pecans. Try another UltraMeal shake  in the afternoon. Shakes with blueberries are rich in antioxidants.

Order UltraMeal from www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

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Breast cancer

A study followed postmenopausal women to see if any of a variety of supplements reduced their risk of developing breast cancer.  Among women using fish oil supplements, there was a 32% lower risk of developing breast cancer — although not of all types of breast cancer.  

I recommend EPA-DHA 720 by Metagenics. Order @ www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

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Turmeric

 

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Loaded with a potent anti-inflammatory compound called curcumin, this yellow spice may help to increase endurance and speed recovery. In a 2007 study at the University of South Carolina, exercise physiologists gave mice curcumin supplements for three days before a 2.5-hour downhill run. The curcumin reduced muscle inflammation and increased endurance more than 20 percent the next day. So, make turmeric your go-to spice. Add it to marinades, rice, vegetables and more. 

UltraInflamX 360 from Metagenics (www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com) is a great source of tumeric. 

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Vitamin D Update From the Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism

June 16-19, 2010 in Rome, Italy — vitamin D deficiency is a common feature in patients with a range of painful rheumatic and related autoimmune disorders. What is less clear, however, is the amount of vitamin D supplementation that would benefit these patients.

Here are highlights from three recent studies:

  1. Researchers in the UK assessed levels of vitamin D in patients with either inflammatory joint diseases (ie, rheumatoid arthritis, RA), osteoporosis, or unexplained muscle pain (ie, myalgia) — 30 subjects in each group — compared with a control group of 90 patients with chronic back pain [Kelly et al. 2010]. Within all 180 patients (two-thirds female) the median vitamin D level was 15 ng/mL and 58% were below the normal range (defined as 20-58 ng/mL by these authors). The median vitamin D level in control patients (with back pain) was 20 ng/mL compared with statistically significant lower medians of 14 ng/mL in the RA group, 12 ng/mL in the osteoporosis group, and 12 ng/mL in the myalgia group. The authors expressed surprise that vitamin D deficiencies also were evident in persons with diffuse muscle pain but suggested that patients in all groups would benefit from vitamin D supplementation. Note: Why patients with back pain were chosen as a control group is unclear, as other research has already found such patients to be vitamin D insufficient (ie, <30 ng/mL) overall.
  2. A second study, conducted by Italian researchers, focused on 1,191 patients (85% female) with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to determine a correlation between vitamin D deficiency and several clinical measures of disease activity [Idolazzi et al. 2010]. They found that levels of 25(OH)D were deficient (<20 ng/mL) in 52% of the patients not taking a vitamin D supplement and in one third of those taking supplements (?800 IU/day). In non-supplemented patients low levels of 25(OH)D significantly correlated with worse scores on 3 measures of disease activity: Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, Mobility Activities of Daily Living Score, and Number of Swollen Joints Count. Significantly lower 25(OH)D levels were found in patients with active disease compared with those in disease remission and in those who were not responding to treatment compared with patients with a good response. Therefore, vitamin D sufficiency appears to be directly related to the course of rheumatoid arthritis and response to treatment; however, the authors conclude that further research is needed to assess the benefits of vitamin D supplementation in these patients.
  3. Another reported study from Italian researchers evaluated the impact of vitamin D supplementation in patients with either inflammatory autoimmune disease (IAD; rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, or connective tissue diseases; n=43) and noninflammatory autoimmune disease (NIAD; osteoarthritis or osteoporosis; n=57) [Sainaghi et al. 2010]. Mean 25(OH)D levels between the two groups at outset were equivalently deficient — 12.6±7.5 ng/mL IAD group, 13.1±8.8 ng/mL NIAD group. Following daily supplementation with 800 to 1000 IU of vitamin D3 for 6 months, only 29% of all patients reached 25(OH)D levels ?30 ng/mL considered to be sufficient and there were no significant differences observed between the IAD and NIAD groups. The authors conclude that, while the amount of supplementation was not adequate to normalize 25(OH)D levels in their patients the response to vitamin D (or lack thereof) did not appear to be influenced by the presence of an inflammatory autoimmune condition.

COMMENTARY: A separate presentation at EULAR 2010, based on a large multinational survey of women with RA, reported that among the 75% who were taking analgesic medications more than 7 in 10 (72%) still experienced daily pain [Strand et al. 2010]. Two-thirds of the respondents said that they constantly look for new ideas to address pain. Therefore, the studies above are of great importance because they demonstrate that painful inflammatory and noninflammatory rheumatologic or bone conditions are generally accompanied by vitamin D deficiencies. Based on prior research, it is not surprising that daily supplementation of 800 to 1000 IU of vitamin D3 was inadequate to significantly raise 25(OH)D to more normal levels. It is disappointing that none of the 3 research teams proceeded to the next step of testing more ample vitamin D supplementation and assessing outcomes on pain relief and/or disease moderation.

REFERENCES: 
Idolazzi L, Bagnato G, Bianchi G, et al. Vitamin D deficiency in rheumatoid arthritis: prevalence, determinants, and associations with disease activity. A cross-sectional study. Ann Rheum Dis. 2010;69(Suppl 3):516. Abstract SAT0093.
Kelly C, Scott K, Bell G, et al. Vitamin D levels in a spectrum of rheumatic disease. Ann Rheum Dis. 2010;69(Suppl 3:481. Abstract FRI0509.
Sainaghi PP, Bellan M, Carda S, et al. Response to vitamin D supplementation in inflammatory autoimmune diseases: a retrospective study. Ann Rheum Dis. 2010;69(Suppl 3):652. Abstract SAT0506.
Strand V, Emery P, Fleming S, Coke E. The impact of rheumatoid arthritis on women: focus on pain, productivity, and relationships. Ann Rheum Dis 2010;69(Suppl 3):748. Abstract OP0002-PARE.

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A new study suggests exercising before breakfast will counter a high-calorie diet.

Researchers in Belgium had 28 healthy, young men consume a diet of 50% fat — 30% more calories than they had been previously eating. Then, they divided the men into three groups: One group didn’t exercise at all; the second group performed four, strenuous hour-long workout sessions after breakfast per week; and the third group performed exactly the same exercise routine as the second, but did so before they ate breakfast.

After six weeks, the non-exercisers gained an average of six pounds. But what was striking is that the group that worked out before breakfast gained no weight, whereas the after breakfast group put on an average of three pounds.

I’ve been working out first thing in the morning for years. I have my UltraMeal protein shake after my workout as my breakfast — working out before putting food into your stomach probably causes the body to burn fat stores. It’s OK to hydrate with water while working out. Sorry to tell all those late afternoon and nightime gym goers!

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Antioxidants: The Benefits of Certain Foods

As we age our brain suffers damage that causes our mental functions to slow down, lose memory, and our ability to focus weakens. Antioxidants can help reverse this damage. But what is the right combination of nutrients that help prevent memory loss?

An easy answer is that blueberries are a great food choice to help because they are loaded with antioxidants. Add fresh blueberries to your yogurt at breakfast time.

In 1999, Dr. Joseph published a landmark study on the subject in the Journal of Neuroscience. His study revealed that blueberries reversed mental aging. Dr. Joseph took four groups of rats and fed them a normal diet. Three of the groups were given strawberry, spinach, or blueberry extracts. Over the course of 18 weeks, he tested the rats for coordination and mental functioning.

The blueberry group performed best on the coordination tests. This group also showed improved neuron functioning. His research led him to nickname blueberries “brainberries.” He has since released several other studies on the subject.

Blueberries also function as anti-inflammatory agents to protect brain integrity.

Blueberries are also rich in phytochemicals. It’s clear that blueberries are good for you. But they can be even better. The trick is to eat them foods rich in fats. At the top of the list are walnuts and avocado. Walnuts are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. That makes blueberries and walnuts a powerful combination. These foods promote youthful flexibility in brain cell membranes.

“Polyphenols in berries and fatty acids in walnuts fluidize the cell membrane,” says Dr. Joseph. “They make it responsive to a wide array of signals.” This increases the efficiency of those transactions.

Walnuts also block disease-causing inflammation in our cells. Recent research links inflammation to Alzheimer’s disease, so reducing inflammation is important to promote better mental function. It might even reverse Alzheimer’s disease.

The Brain Antioxidant I Recommend

 I recommend two products by Metagenics 1)  EPA-DHA 72o – an omega 3 fish oil 2) Celepro – contains green tea extract.

Otherwise, try a handful of blackberries and mix them with almonds. Wash them down with green tea. All three are packed with antioxidants. Switch it up and go for strawberries and pecans. These are both rich in antioxidants. The best thing is antioxidants don’t just boost brain power. They promote overall good health.

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Hearing loss & nutrition

High blood levels of homocysteine can increase the risk of hearing loss, and low folate levels sharply increase that risk even more. 

Elevated homocysteine can obstruct blood flow to the cochlea–the section of the inner ear that converts vibrations to electrical signals. Homocysteine is best known for creating heart problems. Most importantly, an elevated homocysteine level is an independent risk factor for heart disease. High levels of this amino acid are also linked with Alzheimer’s disease, kidney disease, and vision problems.  

So could a couple of B vitamins help?

Well, we know that high levels of vitamin B12 and folate (also known as B9) are associated with low homocysteine levels. 

Homocysteine levels tend to rise as we age. So…if folate is low, homocysteine high, and hearing is impaired, can some folic acid (synthetic folate) help?

One study says yes. But don’t expect miracles.

Researchers in the Netherlands gave 800 micrograms of folic acid or a placebo to nearly 730 subjects over the age of 50 with high homocysteine levels. After three years, average rate of decline in hearing low frequencies was significantly less in the folic acid group compared to placebo. But both groups had similar decline in hearing higher frequencies.

But folic acid isn’t your only option.

Vinpocetine is an herbal extract that improves circulation. Ideally, it might help alleviate reduced blood flow to the cochlea–especially when your meal plan contains dietary sources of folate, such as beans, chickpeas, asparagus, spinach, and other leafy green vegetables.

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Fosamax, Boniva, Actonel, and other osteoporosis drugs

The more we find out about this drug, the worse it gets.  If you are on these meds I hope you’ll do your research and consider natural alternatives like Ostera from Metagenics. Using a bisphosphonate drug–especially when taken for several years increases your risk of esophageal cancer. 

Have you ever wondered about those specific instructions that tell bisphosphonate users to drink a full glass of water and not lie down for 30 minutes after taking the drug?  If the drug isn’t swallowed properly, it can irritate the esophagus. If that happens too often, it can cause esophagitis–inflammation of the esophagus. 

A few years ago, Danish researchers reviewed more than 11,000 medical records and found that patients with esophagitis were significantly more likely to develop esophageal cancer.

Recognizing the importance of this potential link, a team of UK researchers examined medical records for more than 78,000 patients. As reported this past September in the British Medical Journal, the UK team found that extended bisphosphonate use (about five years) nearly DOUBLED the risk of esophageal cancer.

This is pretty horrifying when you consider that more than 20 million people have used Fosamax since it was introduced in the 90s. And that’s just one brand of this very popular class of drugs.

I recommend Ostera and Cal-Apatite. These can be ordered @ www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

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