All Posts tagged whey protein

Whey Protein Shows Body Weight Benefits

Supplements of whey protein (like UltraMeal from Metagenics) may improve body weight without restricting energy intakes or habitual diets in obese and overweight adults, suggests a new study by scientists from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Fifty-six grams of whey protein (WP) per day for six months were associated with a two percent reduction in body weight, compared to a group consuming an equal amount of calories from carbohydrates, according to findings published in the Journal of Nutrition.

The study, funded by USDA and the U.S. Whey Protein Research Consortium (USWPRC), found that the whey protein supplement was associated with a reduction in levels of a hormone called ghrelin, which is reported to serve as a hunger signal and may boost food intake.

USDA researchers wrote “habitual consumption of supplemental protein may result in improved body composition and incremental, but ultimately significant, weight-loss.” 

This research is consistent with my recommendations that higher protein diets, and whey protein in particular (Metagenics UltraMeal) helps weight management and body composition.

I recommend exercise and Ultrameal shakes.

USDA researchers recruited 73 overweight and obese adults and randomly assigned them to receive two 200-calorie beverages a day, consisting of 28 grams of whey or soy protein, plus carbohydrate or carbohydrate alone per serving for 23 weeks. No other instructions were provided about diet.

At the end of the study, the researchers report that the whey protein group’s body weight was approximately four pounds lower than the carbohydrate group, and their body fat was five pounds less than the carbohydrate group.

In addition, a one-inch reduction in waist size was reported in the whey group, compared to the carbohydrate and soy protein groups.

“Short-term weight-loss requires energy restriction, and higher protein diets may assist in this acute weight reduction; however, protein supplementation, particularly WP, in overweight and obese individuals may assist in long-term maintenance of body weight without energy restriction.”

The Journal of Nutrition; Published online ahead of print.

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Whey Protein Helps Lower Blood Pressure

Whey protein beverages reduced blood pressure in young men and women in a six-week controlled intervention. A study out of Washington State University found that daily consumption of whey protein resulted in at least a six-point reduction in average blood pressure of women and men who had pre-existing high blood pressure.

This study is published in the International Dairy Journal. Whey protein as in UltraMeal is low-cost and has not been linked to any adverse effects. I recommend at least 2 scops daily. I order my whey proteain from Metagenics at www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com 

High blood pressure is often referred to as the “silent killer” as it typically does not present with any symptoms. However, high blood pressure is strongly correlated with stroke risk, as well as risk of heart disease, the nation’s number-one killer. Risk factors for high blood pressure include: age, black race, family history, obesity or overweight, lack of exercise, smoking, a high sodium diet, inadequate potassium and vitamin D, heavy drinking and emotional stress. High blood pressure can also lead to an aneurysm, heart failure, kidney problems, vision loss, metabolic syndrome (which can lead to type 2 diabetes) and memory problems.

International Dairy Journal 20(11):753-760, 2010

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Whey Protein Holds Fat-Fighting Potential

New research completed in Switzerland shows that whey protein supplementation may improve blood lipid profiles and reduce levels of liver fat by 20%.

The study, published in Clinical Nutrition, suggests that four weeks of supplementation with whey protein may significantly reduce the markers of fatty liver disease in obese women by reducing the amount of fat inside liver cells. The research found that whey protein improved key markers of blood lipid profiles—an important risk marker for heart disease.

I recommend UltraMeal Whey by Metagenics. This is a delicious , nutritionally fortified, powered meal replacement with 15 grams of purity certified whey protein.

Order at www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

Clinical Nutrition Published online ahead of print.

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Whey protein question

Whey protein has large amounts of high Branched Chain Amino Acids (BCAA) and is often used as a post-workout recovery drink They contain cysteine – which increases Glutathione, a powerful endogenous antioxidant enzyme.

The concern about whey protein is that it can have some potential adverse effects, because it greatly elevates insulinemia – although it can be therapeutic for diabetics in the short term. I suspect that whey protein could be detrimental long term, as hyperinsulinemia can down-regulate the insulin receptor and lead to insulin resistance. Insulin resistance underlies the Metabolic Syndrome, and is implicated in various other diseases, such as Acne, Alzheimer, various cancers, Coronary Heart Disease, Myopia, PCOS, etc.

We have alternatives if you are allergic to whey or concerned about long term effects. UltraMeal shakes are also made from soy or rice. I would swithch out my protein powder sources every six to eight weeks. Snack on lean meat and seafood because these are very good sources of BCAA. If you want a protein drink immediately after strength training to speed recovery and increase muscle mass, I would suggest ~9 grams of essential amino acids, using Metagenics BioPure Protein along with bluberries or a banana.

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