All Posts tagged Weight Lifting

Exercise Programs

I like using the following ‘exercise template’ when educating patients on what a long-term exercise program includes:

1) Perform self-myofascial release using foam rolls, sticks, and “knot-outs” as the beginning of an exercise session. These are tools to break up hypertonicity and tension in muscles.

2) Perform stretching (static and dynamic) on the overactive muscles. I teach my clients techniques using the ‘Stretch straps’, yoga straps, and bands.

3) Perform movements or isometric exercises that re-awaken and/or strengthen the core and underactive muscles. These are usually bodyweight or thera-band exercises targeted at isolated weak stabilizers muscles.

4) Perform whole body integrated exercises that will add lean muscle and decrease fat.

5) Next, if the client has more time and wants to perform cardio work, this is where I place it.

After talking with patients and hearing what they do or don’t do physically, my suggestions begin first with ‘remove the negatives’. I discuss proper posture, breathing, hydration, diet, supplements, attitude, and sleep. I want to make sure patients are doing the right thing and not the wrong (negative) thing in each of these categories. In addition some patients need to “add in” cardio, strength, or flexibility training depending on there goals. The ‘fatty-bomba-lattes’ who do absolutely no physical activity need to start a walking program; the long distance runner, swimmer or cyclist might need a flexibility program; the Country Western dancer’s and the ‘dance-with-the stars’ people might need some strength training; the yoga dominant person might need some free weight training; the weight lifter might need some cardio and flexibility added on. Depending on the patient’s goals (fat loss, finish a marathon, flexibility, etc), I often find the program they designed isn’t “enough” on its own.

To read the whole article click on link….

http://digital.theamericanchiropractor.com/20130601#!/20

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For all you cardio junkies

I am so sick of clients doing excessive  cardio – I mean mindless long runs, or bouts on the bike or eliptical. I hear about clients doing 60 minute cardio sessions and they are stiff as a board and in pain. The part that ‘kills me’ is that they won’t stretch or even listen to me when I talk to them about doing some weight lifting. I know cardio is one fat burning strategy, but it is time consuming and the reality is that aerobic activities burn far fewer calories than you think.  After doing 20-30 minutes of cardio you may feel as though you’ve burned 600 calories but the cold reality is far different. For example, researchers measured the number of calories burned when walking versus running. The study showed that the average man burns just 124 calories when running a mile and only 88 when walking the same distance. So by running three miles you can expect to burn about 396 calories and by walking three miles you will burn about 240.

Figures for other aerobic activities are shown below (these are calculated using a man who weighs 190 pounds).

•    Stationary bike (light): 474 calories per hour;
•    Walking uphill (3.5 miles per hour): 518 calories per hour;
•    High impact aerobics: 604 calories per hour;
•    Stationary bike (moderate): 604 calories per hour;
•    Jogging (light pace): 604 calories per hour;
•    Running (5 miles per hour): 690 calories per hour;
•    Stationary bike (vigorous): 906 calories per hour;

To lose one pound of body weight – you have to burn calories through exercise activity, or decrease your intake of food calories by approximately 3,000 calories. One strategy I use is to decrease 250 calories of food daily and increase your activity by 250 calories per day to reach the 3,000 calorie mark each week to lose a pound a week. Make sense? Do 30 minutes of cardio (intervals = sprints) to burn body fat and then do some weight lifting to build muscle which automatically burns more calories during rest. Or you can combine cardio + resistance. That’s what I personally do.

Too much aerobic exercise will burn calories from fat but can burn fuel from muscle cells—resulting in a loss of muscle mass—now you are screwed. The reason this happens is that periods of aerobic exercise cause the body to shift into survival mode. In this state, it strives to preserve access to fat cells by also burning fuel derived from muscle cells. It does this because the body is incapable of understanding our motivation for doing cardio. As far as it is concerned, it just needs to maintain fat reserves for any pending emergency situations where we might not have access to food.

By combining your workouts with resistance + cardio activities, you can burn up to 44% more calories. The bottom line is that resistance + cardio workouts burn considerably more calories and fat than ordinary cardio alone.

Just tell me what you like to do and I can turn any of your activities into a  cardio + resistance workout. For example, if you like to walk or jog you can pick up a set of dumbbells, some ankle weights or even a weight vest. If biking is your thing, just kick up the resistance. Whatever cardio activity it is that you like to do, I’ll show you how to add some resistance and not only will you burn more fat but you’ll also be able to maintain more of your hard-earned muscle mass.

Come in for a few sessions and I’ll teach you how to do a cardio + restance workout. This will help you lean out!

 310-473-2911

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I want to get more cut & lean

How do you build bigger muscles? Do you think it’s lots of sets and reps? 

Most people are not lifting heavy enough weights: Lifting heavier weights will get you results. When you were a beginner at weight lifting, you could gain size and strength as long as the weight you used on any given exercise was at least 60 percent of the amount you could lift for a single max-effort repetition. Most people start out lifting with a weight they can lift 15 to 20 times in a single set.  

As you gain experience and get comfortable with the technique, you need at least 80 percent of your 1-rep max to grow bigger and stronger. Now, we’re talking about a weight you could probably lift about 8 times, but that 8th rep should be hard to complete.

Understand this concept: If you typically perform multiple sets of 8 to 10 repetitions for each exercise the weight may be too light. If you are using the right poundadge  (80 percent of your max for 3 or 4 sets), each set would consist of 5 or 6 repetitions only. 

If you are a serious lifter and have been lifting consistently for much of your adult life, you might need 85 to 90 percent of your 1-rep max to see further progress. In a normal workout with multiple sets of each exercise, this might mean only 2, 3, or 4 repetitions per set. There is a problem with this: Nobody can lift near-max weights on every exercise of every workout. You could get hurt and it is exhausting.

I also BioPureProtein & UltraMeal shakes to help reduce fat and increase lean muscle mass www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta’ehealth.com . This combination of nutrition with my 10 week 20 minute fat loss workouts is a great approach http://www.toyourhealth.com/mpacms/tyh/article.php?id=1277.

  

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“How do I boost my muscle size”

You need to lift weights. Pick the size (weight in pounds or kilograms)) of a dumbell or kettlebell that you have difficulty completeing the 6th rep with. Do 3 sets of 6 reps. Lift weight 4 times per week and do cardio twice a week. More than simply lifting weights, you need to feed your muscles with quality protein and good nutrition. That means eating low carb (about 100-150 grams per day) and lots of green vegetables (no more than two fruits a day). You need to learn the crucial differences between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ fats – and how to make sure you avoid the ‘bad’ fat!

To get the ‘micro-nutrients’ – the vitamins, minerals and anti-oxidants that are so crucial to building muscle mass given the additional stresses that weight training imposes on the body I recommend UltraMeal shakes. Use 2 scoops of the powder in water twice a day. Add 1 scoop of BioPure Protein to each shake.  This is the best program I have seen work over and over for my clients that want to lose fat and increase lean muscle mass.  

Order UltraMeal & BioPure Protein from www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

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Muscle Building Snack Ideas

Twenty grams of protein is the magic number to ingest for muscle-building, half before and half after your workout.

Here’s a list of 5 great snack ideas:

Chicken, Turkey, or Tuna (3 oz)
14-22 grams protein
65-100 calories
Wrap it in a piece of lettuce or enjoy it by itself. Four slices of chicken or turkey provide 14 grams of protein, while half a can of tuna has nearly 22 grams of protein.

Eggs (three)
18-19 grams protein
230 calories
Hard-boiled eggs are most convenient, but eggs are easy to scramble. Put them in a grab & go container and enjoy a little before & after your workout. For those of you that know me, I have always thought eggs are a great food.

Chocolate 2% Milk (16 oz)
About 17 grams protein
330 calories
A study in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition shows that chocolate milk may be the ideal postworkout beverage for building muscle

FitFood. This is a protein powder – Whey or Dairy-free, Soy-free (21 g per 2 scoops)
21 grams protein
210 calories

This shake product made by XYMOGEN supports healthy body composition; immune support; cardiovascular health; healthy glycemic management and weight management. Mix it with rice milk or almond milk instead of water if you want a bit more protein. Order by calling 1-800-647-6100 or online @ XYMOGEN.com. Email me for my PIN #.

Greek Yogurt (5.3 oz container)
15 grams protein
80 calories
Greek-style yogurt is packed with protein. Skip yogurts with fruit and sugar; to add flavor, drop in a few berries, nuts or cottage cheese.

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