All Posts tagged soy protein

Soy protein helps improve good cholesterol

Supplements of soy protein, but not milk protein, may improve blood levels of HDL (good) cholesterol, and enhance the overall cholesterol balance, according to a new study in the  European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Forty grams per day of soy protein was associated with significant decreases in total cholesterol levels, compared to carbohydrate supplements, and improvements in HDL levels, compared with milk protein. “Our study is the first randomized controlled trial to compare the effects of soy protein, milk protein and complex carbohydrate on serum lipids,” report researchers from the University of Mississippi, Tulane University and Kaiser Permanente Southern California.

“There is increasing evidence that consumption of soy protein in place of animal protein lowers blood cholesterol levels and may provide other cardiovascular benefits. Our study provides additional evidence that consumption of soy protein in place of carbohydrate might improve the lipid profile,” they added.

Led by Dr. Jiang He from Tulane University, the researchers recruited 352 healthy adults with an average age of 47.7 to participate in their randomized, controlled trial.

Participants were assigned to receive 40 grams per day supplementation of soy protein, milk protein or complex carbohydrate for eight weeks in a random order.

Results showed that, compared with carbohydrates, the soy protein was associated with a 3.97 mg/dl reduction in total cholesterol levels and a 0.12 mg/dl reduction in the ratio of total HDL cholesterol.

In addition, compared to milk protein, the soy protein was associated with a 1.54 mg/dl increase in HDL cholesterol levels and a 0.14 mg/dl decrease in the ratio of total HDL cholesterol.

On the other hand, milk protein supplementation was significantly associated with a 1.13 mg/dl decrease in HDL levels, compared to carb supplements, added the researchers.

“Our study suggests that soy protein supplement reduces total cholesterol and total/HDL cholesterol ratio compared with carbohydrate, and increases HDL and reduces total/HDL cholesterol ratio compared with milk protein,” and “The effect of milk protein did not confer a significant favorable effect on any lipid measures compared with carbohydrate.”

I have many patients that I recommend UltraMeal protein shakes (medical food) to that can contain either whey protein, soy protein or rice protein. It all depends on the individual.

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Anything New For Heart Health?

Earlier this year Canadian researchers said that combining prebiotics and soy protein may lower cholesterol levels and boost heart health.

Consumption of a soy-food-based diet, providing soy protein and isoflavones in combination with 10 g per day of oligofructose-enriched inulin, led to significant reductions in levels of LDL cholesterol, according to results of a small randomized controlled crossover study published in Metabolism Clinical and Experimental.

The LDL reductions were only observed when soy and prebiotics were co-ingested, an observation that suggests “the provision of fermentable substrates may be one means to increase the effectiveness of soy foods as part of a dietary strategy for cardiovascular disease risk reduction,” wrote the researchers led by David Jenkins from the University of Toronto.

The association between soy protein and blood lipid levels led the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve a cardiovascular disease reduction claim for soybean protein in 1999.

Twenty-three people with an average age of 58 and average blood LDL levels of 4.18 millimoles per liter were recruited and randomly assigned to one of three groups: One group received a soy-food-containing diet, providing 30 g per day of soy protein and 61 mg per day of isoflavones, plus maltodextrin (placebo); the second group received the soy food diet, plus prebiotic; the final group received a low-fat dairy diet, plus the prebiotic. Two weeks separated each dietary intervention and 23 people completed all three phases.

The results showed that the joint consumption of soy and prebiotic produced greater reductions in LDL cholesterol of around 0.18 mmol/L and improved the ratio of LDL cholesterol to HDL cholesterol, compared with only the prebiotic phase.

HDL cholesterol levels were also significantly increased following the soy plus prebiotic diet, compared with only the prebiotic.

“These data support the lipid-lowering basis for the current FDA health claim for soy foods. They demonstrate how a non-significant (about three percent) LDL cholesterol reduction seen when soy was consumed alone can be converted to a significant (about five percent) LDL cholesterol reduction when soy was taken with a prebiotic,” wrote the researchers.

“We believe the present study therefore supports the value of soy as one of the few cholesterol-lowering foods, in the five percent reduction range, especially when given with fermentable substrates such as would be naturally present in diets that also contained viscous fibers to lower serum cholesterol,” they added.

I recommend UltraMeal Plus 360 by Metagenics as a source of soy protein. Order at www.DrJeffreyTucker.Meta-ehealth.com 

Metabolism Clinical and Experimental 

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BP Drops when Sugary Drinks Are Reduced

Cutting down on sugar-sweetened soft drinks was associated with a drop in blood pressure, researchers found. In a cohort of U.S. adults, those who reduced daily intake of the beverages saw a significant drop in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

full story http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/Hypertension/tb/20264

Many clients with High Blood Pressure are helped by eating a low-glycemic-index dietary food plan and exercise program while incorporating medical foods and nutritional supplements. A low glycemic diet is more effective than a low fat diet in treating obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes.

The specific medical food I use is called UltraMeal® Plus 360 — 2 scoops twice daily
UltraMeal Plus 360 is a medical food formulated to provide specialized, multi-mechanistic
nutritional support for patients with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease by supplying a combination of acacia extract, reduced iso-alpha acids (RIAA), plant sterols, and heart-healthy soy protein and isoflavones.

EPA-DHA Extra Strength® — 2 to 4 softgels twice daily. This is a concentrated and stabilized purity-certified, Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Nano Cell Q10— 1-2 tablespoons daily. Nano Cell Q10 is all natural coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) manufactured to achieve exquisite quality, purity, and bioavailability. COQ10 depletion is well documented in animal and human studies with detrimental cardiac consequences in both animal models and human trials. Deficiency is also implicated in increased incidence of cataracts, neoplasia, peripheral neuropathies, and some psychiatric disturbances.
ORDER these products by clicking on the Metagenics link

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