All Posts tagged snacks

Nuts are a great snack!

I always suggest nuts as a snack. They provide  many different vitamins, minerals and healthy fats. Yes nuts have fat in them, but most nuts are full of the good fats and lower in the bad fats. If you know me, then you know I’m about low carb and not low fat diets.

Griel et al, showed that supplementing the diet for 4- weeks with nuts has tremendous benefits on lipid profiles, especially LDL cholesterol. They concluded that not only was the mono and polyunsaturated fats important in lowering cholesterol, but that nuts have may have other compounds that help alter the cholesterol levels.

Jiang et al, concluded that a diet rich in nuts can also help reduce the risk of developing Diabetes. One of the bigger concerns in this study was the level of obesity of the participants, because obesity is a higher indicator of risk for developing diabetes, but they found that increasing dietary intake of nuts did not alter body weight at all.

WHAT ABOUT ALLERGIES? If you are allergic to nuts, you are s@#* out of luck, and will obviously need to avoid them.

WHAT ABOUT WEIGHT GAIN?  Sure, extra weight gain can occur from eating too many nuts – remember I’m recommending nuts as a snack, not making a meal out of them. To me a snack means around 15.  
Typical nuts have higher than normal levels of the good fats, which are mono and polyunsaturated fatty acids.  Nuts are lower in saturated fats, which are the fat’s that lead to altered cholesterol levels and excess weight gain.  

 

Not only do nuts have the potential to help lower cholesterol and prevent metabolic disorders, but nuts can also have a satiety effect on the body.  Satiety refers to the satisfaction that happens when we eat a meal and feel full or satisfied.

Nuts should be a staple in everyone’s diets (except of course people who have severe allergic reactions to nuts) for the cardio-protective effects of the healthy fat levels, the satisfaction of ingesting a healthy snack and finally the potential benefits.

I recommend Macadamia nuts and marcona almonds – relax, be primal!

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Good Organic Food Choices

Meal Replacement Shakes: UltraMeal Plus 360 (order @ www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com)

2 scoops with water or juice

190 calories

15 grams (g) protein

24 g carbs

3 g fat

 

Eggs: Eggland’s Best Organic
Scrambled, fried, or poached, these heart-healthier eggs cook up flavorful and fluffy.
One large egg:
70 calories
6 grams (g) protein
0 g carbs
4 g fat

 

Cereal: Kashi Whole Wheat Biscuits, Cinnamon Harvest
One serving is nearly 20 percent of your daily fiber, and it doesn’t taste like the box it came in.
2 oz:
180 calories
6 g protein
43 g carbs (5 g fiber)
1 g fat

Milk: Stonyfield Organic Reduced Fat
1 cup:
130 calories
8 g protein
13 g carbs
5 g fat

Lunch Meat: Applegate Farms Organic Roasted Turkey Breast
2 oz:
50 calories
10 g protein
1 g carbs
0 g fat

Deli Cheese: Applegate Farms Organic Mild Cheddar Cheese
1 slice:
85 calories
5 g protein
0 g carbs
6 g fat

Condiment: Annie’s Naturals Organic Dijon Mustard
No calories, tons of flavor  

Postworkout Recovery Drink: Organic Valley Reduced Fat Chocolate Milk
Good  protein for your muscles.
Per cup:
170 calories
8 g protein
24 g carbs
5 g fat

Meat: Full Circle Bison Ranch Organic Gras Fed Buffalo (Rib Eye)
3 oz:
150 calories
25 g protein
0 g carbs
5 g fat

Yogurt: Stoneyfield Oikos Organic Greek Yogurt with Honey
Sweetened naturally (and organically) without added preservatives.
5.3 oz container:
120 calories
13 g protein
18 g carbs

Breakfast shakes: UltraMeal Whey medical food (2 scoops with water or juice)

150 calories

15 g protein

24 g carbs

1 g fat

order UltraMeal @ www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

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Smelling food can trick your brain into thinking you’ve eaten

This weightloss information appeared in the fitness section of MSNBC:

If you want to lose weight should you suppress your appetite or increase your metabolism (the rate at which
your body uses food for fuel)?  The answer is to eat the right foods at the right time.

Most people go off a food plan at night (after dinner) when they feel the urge to nosh…so to curb your appetite tonight…. use these tips from the article:

1. Protein First
“Rise and shine with protein.”  But what does this have to do with night-time cravings? Everything. Set the body up to use your own fat-stores for fuel by eating protein in the morning and your appetite FOR fatty foods goes way down during the day and the night. Protein is “thermogenic”, meaning it helps increase your metabolism. It also acts as a natural appetite regulator.

2. Grapefruit
In a study at the Nutrition and Metabolic Research Center at the Scripps Clinic in San Diego, people who ate half a grapefruit with each meal lost an average of 3.6 pounds in three months. That doesn’t sound like a lot (and it isn’t) but that’s ALL they changed.
Grapefruit makes for a good night time snack, especially if you have a few bites of lean protein with it.

3. Use your nose & smell !
This is a great trick. Smelling food can trick your brain into thinking you’ve eaten. A recent study found that those who inhaled peppermint in scent form every 2 hours at (get this) ate 2700 calories LESS per week than they normally did. If you decrease your calorie intake by just 2500 calories per week, that’s a fatloss of more than half a pound a week… from sniffing peppermint!

Vanilla also works. You can keep vanilla-scented drops or candles around the house or office and take a sniff every few hours.

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Pre-Workout Foods: Protein Bar vs. Eggs?

• Eating 60 to 90 minutes before exercising helps to prevent light-headedness and loss of concentration during moderate to high-intensity activity. You’ll need a simple fat, sugar and protein combination—this balance can be found in both a healthy breakfast food or an UltraMeal Bar or UltraMeal shake (Metagenics link).
• Which will power you through your workout without a crash? Try two eggs one day and a bar the next. A bar is easy, but the eggs are real. Both are filling food, and pack good protein. Egg whites are the purest form of muscle-building fuel available.

Whatever you choose just get going on your exercise and be consistent!

• Are Eggs good for me?
• Eggs contain tons of important vitamins and minerals, and egg whites contain the purest form of protein available in whole foods—exactly what you’ll need to feed your muscles during a workout.

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Snacks for kids at “The half-time”

I was asked by a Mom, “What should I give the kids while playing football?”

Football, soccer, rugby, baseball, basketball — what’s the best snack to provide your kids?
I’ve seen a lot of sliced oranges passed out at half time, and like many nutritional practices that have stood the test of time, this almost certainly has some merit. Some mom’s prefer pretzels because they contain high levels of sodium. But I’ve also seen a lot of donuts, cakes, and cookies handed out. Stay away from foods with hydro-genated vegetable oils or trans-fats. Food colorings and other additives are often contained in these kinds of snacks, which have been associated with disruptive behavior and poor concentration in school children. I’ve even noticed kids “space out” on the field after these types of snakes!

Concentrate on fluids, electrolyte and carbohydrate needs. If your child gets fatigue during games and his/her general performance declines towards the end of the game, they are not getting the right snacks.
I recommend the UltraMeal Bar (www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com) as the best pre game snack (30-60 minutes pre-game) – it’s a mixture of protein and carbohydrates.

If two players have equal skill, or both teams have equal players, it is even more important to consider nutrition that may influence game skill and concentration when considering strategies to win. Carbohydrate depletion is associated with reduced exercise capacity and poor concentration – these are effects that may be compounded by dehydration. Both dehydration and muscle glycogen (sugar) depletion have been associated with injury and accidents, so efforts to prevent these affecting performances could have repercussions well beyond the immediate game.

The impact of how your child plays, could well depend upon prior meals and eating habits. Pre-game hydration is so important – keep it simple and give them water. If your child starts a game in a sub-optimal state of hydration they will be in a worse state at half-time.

Dehydration resulting in a loss of body mass of 2% or greater can result in reduced endurance exercise capacity, and sprinting and sport-specific skills can be adversely affected by losses of 3% or more. I don’t encourage players to consume more fluid than required to maintain performance, why weight them down!

During The Workout/Game: Should you have Gatorade vs. Water?
• At 200 calories per bottle, Gatorade is promised to replace your carbohydrates and electrolytes lost during an intense workout—and it also tastes pretty good. When you’re pushing hard during an event, is it better than water? No & yes! If your workout is longer than an hour, you might need all that sports science in a Gatorade, but for normal training sessions, hit the bottled water.
• During a long cardio session, you need the over-the-top advanced science of Gatorade.

Nutrients, especially electrolytes, may prevent fatigue and reduce muscle cramps in the second half. The most important electrolyte lost in sweat is sodium and research has shown a wide individual variation in sodium losses – as low as the equivalent of 1g of salt to over 6g in 90 minutes. Assuming that players start a game with reasonable sodium stores, most players are unlikely to become performance limited due to sodium depletion during one game; the main role of sodium in a half-time situation is to encourage fluid uptake in situations where large fluid volumes need to be consumed at half-time (because sodium stimulates thirst).

In players starting with an adequate nutritional status, performance towards the end of games depends on carbohydrate. Shortfalls are almost certainly responsible for fatigue in games, irrespective of player position or standard. Low carbohydrate levels can compromise mental skills as well as physical performance, and there is consensus that carbohydrate supplementation can improve performance.

It’s worth cautioning against a ‘one size fits all’ policy with regard to player nutrition. In hot conditions, and for players with very high sweat rates, more fluid may be needed to prevent dehydration reaching detrimental levels.

References
1. Int J Sports Med 2005 Mar; 26(2):90-95
2. Arch Dis Child 2004; 89:506-511
3. J Sports Sci 2006 Jul; 24(7):665-74
4. Sports Med 2005; 35(6):501-36
5. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1993 Dec; 25(12):1370-4
6. J Sports Sci 2006 Jul; 24(7):675-85
7. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 2003 Sep; 13(3): 303-19
8. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2006; 38(9):1650-1658

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