All Posts tagged protein

How Much Protein Do I Recommend?

Hi Jeff,

Could you explain why you think we need 100 g/120 g protein per day. I was just reading something and they said 50 g.  This area has a lot of debate, doesn’t it?

Great question!  High protein foods send signals to the brain that keep you from being hungry for hours – stronger signals than either carbohydrates or fat gives. For a typical woman, I recommend about 100 grams of protein per day. That would be 25-30 grams at breakfast and lunch, a 25 gram protein snack in the late afternoon, and again at dinner. For a typical man, I recommend 125-150 grams of protein per day: 30-40 grams each for breakfast and lunch, 20-30 grams in the afternoon snack, and 50-75 grams at dinner and during the night before bed.
 
I think anyone who is dieting should get a minimum of 50 grams of protein per day to be safe.
 
I like at least 30 percent of total calories from protein. I determine the exact amount of protein someone needs by there lean body mass, which includes everything in your body that isn’t fat, such as muscle, bone, organs, and skin. I get this information from doing a body composition analysis. The number of pounds of a persons lean body mass is about the number of grams of protein you need each day.   
 
Hope this helps.
Jeff
ww.DrJeffreyTucker.com
 

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Whey Protein Shows Body Weight Benefits

Supplements of whey protein (like UltraMeal from Metagenics) may improve body weight without restricting energy intakes or habitual diets in obese and overweight adults, suggests a new study by scientists from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Fifty-six grams of whey protein (WP) per day for six months were associated with a two percent reduction in body weight, compared to a group consuming an equal amount of calories from carbohydrates, according to findings published in the Journal of Nutrition.

The study, funded by USDA and the U.S. Whey Protein Research Consortium (USWPRC), found that the whey protein supplement was associated with a reduction in levels of a hormone called ghrelin, which is reported to serve as a hunger signal and may boost food intake.

USDA researchers wrote “habitual consumption of supplemental protein may result in improved body composition and incremental, but ultimately significant, weight-loss.” 

This research is consistent with my recommendations that higher protein diets, and whey protein in particular (Metagenics UltraMeal) helps weight management and body composition.

I recommend exercise and Ultrameal shakes.

USDA researchers recruited 73 overweight and obese adults and randomly assigned them to receive two 200-calorie beverages a day, consisting of 28 grams of whey or soy protein, plus carbohydrate or carbohydrate alone per serving for 23 weeks. No other instructions were provided about diet.

At the end of the study, the researchers report that the whey protein group’s body weight was approximately four pounds lower than the carbohydrate group, and their body fat was five pounds less than the carbohydrate group.

In addition, a one-inch reduction in waist size was reported in the whey group, compared to the carbohydrate and soy protein groups.

“Short-term weight-loss requires energy restriction, and higher protein diets may assist in this acute weight reduction; however, protein supplementation, particularly WP, in overweight and obese individuals may assist in long-term maintenance of body weight without energy restriction.”

The Journal of Nutrition; Published online ahead of print.

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Workout Recovery – Protein Timing

Numerous studies have already demonstrated that muscles are hungrier for refuelling after exercise than they are before, giving rise to the concept of the ‘post-exercise window of opportunity’. 

In Recovery – the magic ingredient of any training program is protein. I recommend two scoops of UltraMeal powder protein and add a scoop of BioPure Protein (both products are by Metagenics). This makes the best  protein shake. Protein overshadows carbohydrate, which are included in the UltraMeal.

What’s the window of opportunity for maximal uptake – it depends on who you read. Everything I read still points to 20-30 minutes max. bio Pure Protein has all the amino acids –these have to be integrated into your recovery strategy.

Many clients start drinking a protein shake before working out and then immediately after…the body composition results are speaking for themselves.

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Protein Amounts During Pregnancy

I would like to know what amounts of protein are necessary for pregnant women? I have been eating the Paleo Diet since you introduced me to it. This is my first child. I am finding that my protein and fat requirements are significantly higher than what I usually eat.

Is there any research you could direct me to regarding protein requirements for pregnancy based on trimester?

Great question and I am thrilled you are prgnant! The bottom line is that you probably should increase your fat and carbohydrate consumption, and limit protein to about 20-25% of energy, as higher protein intakes than this may prove to be deleterious to mother and fetus for a variety of physiological reasons.

John Speth (an anthropologist) at the University of Michigan wrote a paper on protein aversion in hunter-gatherer women during pregnancy. Listed below is the abstract: (note the 25% protein energy ceiling!!!)

“During seasonal or inter-annual periods of food shortage and restricted total calorie intake, ethnographically and ethnohistorically documented human foragers, when possible, under-utilize foods that are high in protein, such as lean meat, in favour of foods with higher lipid or carbohydrate content. Nutritional studies suggest that one reason for this behaviour stems from the fact that pregnant women, particularly at times when their total calorie intake is marginal, may be constrained in the amount of energy they can safely derive from protein sources to levels below about 25% of total calories. Protein intakes above this threshold may affect pregnancy outcome through decreased mass at birth and increased perinatal morbidity and mortality…”

Pregnant women should include more carbohydrate and fat (i.e. fattier meats) in their diets and limit dietary protein to no more than 20-25% of their total caloric intake.

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It’s 2/2/11 How’s your New Years weight loss resolution going?

Has it been a Happy New Year? I think so! I’m sticking to practicing yoga every other day, and my heavier kettlebell/free weight workout every other day, just like I said I would. Are you giving it your best? Don’t let me hear you f@#* around with resolutions, such as rules of “don’t do x,” or “do x,” but rather, finally resolve to look, feel, and be better! by 12/31/2011…no matter what it takes…and all it really takes is a simple recognition of what’s most important to you (looking GOOD!, losing weight, being more alive!). I’m here to help you take the simple steps to get you there.

For you real dumbheads: when you feel like a splurg, have it.  Just get right back on track the next meal. Eat more protein, less carbs and let’s get you exercising. 

www.DrJeffreyTucker.com

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Protein from UltraMeal Shakes

The biggest barrier to increased protein consumption is that some people are just not big meat and protein eaters.  Once I know your lean body weight by performing the bdy composition analysis, I know how many grams of protein you’ll need in your daily diet. If you are not a big meat eater it makes it harder to get in the suggested quantities of protein to help with your weight loss, but I have a solution.  This is where proper nutritional supplementation is beneficial for weight loss.

UltraMeal is a high quality protein shake.  It helps you get the results we want – keeping on your lean muscle, losing fat, increasing your metabolism and therefore increased weight loss.  

UltraMeal  protein shakes are a medical food made with either soy or  whey protein. Whey protein consumed between meals may help you eat significantly less food than if you were to consume a casein protein shake or nothing at all.  

You don’t have to be a weightlifter to benefit from increased protein consumption.  

Order UltraMeal @ www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

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Protein vs carbs vs fat calories

Your metabolic rate increases after every meal because of the “thermic effect” of eating and digesting food.  Your body burns a different amount of calories depending on the type of macronutrient you are eating.  For example your body doesn’t burn as many calories when digesting carbohydrates and fat as it does with protein.

Your body only burns about 4-7 calories for every 100 calories of carbohydrates or 100 calories of fat that you eat.  Though if you were to eat 100 calories of protein it would require your body to burn roughly 24-28 calories to digest that protein.

If you are looking at net calories your body is only netting about 70% of the protein calories that you consume and netting 93-96% of the carb or fat calories you consume.

Now you decide which food you want to put in your body for weight loss! This is why I like to recommend the UltraMeal shakes. They have protein and other nutrients to burn fat, not muscle. Order UltraMeal shakes at www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

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Protein update – shakes are for everyone

Most of my adult clients would benefit from eating more than the recommended daily intake of 56 grams of protein daily. The benefit of eating more protein is that it dulls hunger and can help prevent obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

How much do you need? Most of my male clients do well with 100-120 grams of protein daily. My female clients need approximately 100 grams daily. My highly trained athletes thrive on even greater amounts. Once I perform the body fat nalysis on you I can be very specific for your individual needs.

If you’re trying to lose weight, protein is crucial. The fewer calories you consume, the more calories should come from protein.

Is all protein the same? Many foods, including nuts and beans, can provide a good dose of protein. But the best sources are dairy products, eggs, meat, and fish. Animal protein is complete—it contains the right proportions of the essential amino acids your body can’t synthesize on its own.

It’s possible to build complete protein from plant-based foods by combining legumes, nuts, and grains at one meal or over the course of a day. But you’ll need to consume 20 to 25 percent more plant-based protein to reap the benefits that animal-derived sources provide. And beans and legumes have carbs that make it harder to lose weight.

Again, stick to lean protein: eggs, low-fat milk, yogurt, lean meat, and fish.

If you’re struggling with your weight, fat itself is not the culprit; carbs are the likely problem. Fat will help keep you full, while carbs can put you on a blood-sugar roller coaster that leaves you hungry later.

At any given moment, even at rest, your body is breaking down and building protein. Every time you eat at least 30 grams of protein, you trigger a burst of protein synthesis that lasts about 3 hours. Eat protein throughout the day so you fuel muscle growth. But our body can process only so much protein in a single sitting. A recent study from the University of Texas found that consuming 90 grams of protein at one meal provides the same benefit as eating 30 grams. It’s like a gas tank, there’s only so much you can put in to maximize performance; the rest is spillover.

Eating protein at all three meals—plus snacking two or three times a day on proteins such as cheese, jerky, and milk—will help you eat less overall. People who start the day with a protein-rich breakfast consume 200 fewer calories a day than those who chow down on a carb-heavy breakfast, like a jam-smeared bagel. 

Workouts and Protein:

When you work out, your muscles are primed to respond to protein, and you have a window of opportunity to promote muscle growth. Split your dose of protein, eating or drinking half 30 minutes before the workout and the other half 30 minutes after. A total of 10 to 20 grams of protein is ideal. 

One study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, pinpointed 20 grams as the best amount of postworkout protein to maximize muscle growth.

Everyone can benefit from the quick hit of amino acids provided by a protein supplement, bar, or shake. Your best bet is a fast-absorbing, high-quality kind like whey protein powder (derived from milk): I recommend the UltraMeal protein shakes or the UltraMeal Bars from Metagenics. Order at www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

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5 Rules for Hard Abs

There is a layer of fat that hides most peoples abs. The closer you come to removing the fat that covers your abs, the more defined every muscle becomes, making you look sexier all over.

I have my nutrition and training programs ‘down’ and have helped shape the best bodies of Los Angeles. 

My clients are cutting body fat way down. If they want single digit body fat – I can help them get it. 

I use the BioDynamics Body Fat Analysis machine to calculate body fat, lean muscle mass, calories, water hydration and much more. Based on these numbers I can help you know how to eat to target your body weight goal. 

Example Diet Choice Formula One: Once we know how many calories you burn a day, and I know your target body weight.  Then I can tell you how  many calories you should consume daily. Plus, I’ll teach you which exercises to perform daily and the number of calories to eat – you can decide how many  meals you want—three, four, five, or six—as long as you don’t eat beyond your daily limit. 
 

Example Diet Choice Formula Two: You don’t like to focus on calories. I’ll teach you to eat the right amounts of the right foods, you’ll speed your results without feeling like you’re on a diet.

Protein
Everyone goes on a  protein shake. These shakes have the raw material for muscle growth and fat loss. They help decrease your appetite and if you did not change a single thing except drink two shakes a day with your regular diet, it will aid in fat loss. 

My  formula: Eat 1 gram of protein for every pound of lean muscle mass on your current body weight. If you have 120 pounds of lean muscle mass on your body, you’ll eat 120 grams of protein. One gram of protein is about 4 calories. So to calculate the calories you’ll be eating from protein, multiply the number of grams by 4. In this case, that’s 460 calories.

Fat
Read my posts on fat. Fat, along with protein keep you from overeating because it makes you feel full. The end result: You stop eating sooner and stay satisfied longer. 

My formula: Eat half a gram of fat for every pound of your target body weight. If your goal is to weigh 180 pounds, that’d be 90 grams of fat. And since 1 gram of fat has about 9 calories, that’s 810 calories from fat. This will be about 40 percent of your total calories.

Carbohydrates
Carbs from vegetables are rich in vitamins and minerals. I encourage lots of colorful vegetables and only two fruits per day.   

My formula: Add your calories from protein and fat, and subtract that total from your allotted daily calories.  This is the amount of calories you can eat from carbs. As protein does, carbs provide about 4 calories per gram—so divide your carb calories by four to determine how many grams of carbs you can eat. In this case, it’s about 158 grams. 

Avoid—candy, baked goods, and sugary drinks. 

Follow these rules:

1. Consume at least 5 servings of vegetables a day (mostly greens). Vegetables are low in calories and high in fiber.

2. Eat no more than 2 servings of fruit a day.

3. Avoid grains. You can eat one serving of  beans and legumes.

4. Work out .

5. Order Metagenics UltraMeal medical food shakes (www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com). Add 2 scoops and mix it with water, almond milk, rice milk or soy milk. 

 

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Jeff, I gotta lose weight

Answer: Eat the right fats and proteins and kick out the starchy carbs.
Don’t be afraid of fat. Avoid trans fats (partially or fully hydrogenated oils) which are found in processed foods. Get healthy fat from lean proteins (grass-fed beef), wild fish, olives/oil, Sacha Inchi oil, avocados, and nuts.
Avoid starches like grains including corn, potatoes, and rice.
Eat plenty of protein. It won’t raise your blood sugar and helps handle insulin better, build muscle and repair tissue – all essential for staying lean and preventing diabetes. Grass-fed beef, free-range poultry, cage-free eggs, and wild salmon are all good choices.
Eat a lot of vegetables. Those that grow above ground are good choices – cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, mushrooms, green beans, leafy green vegetables, and tomatoes.
Eat fruits such as berries and those you can eat with the skin on. Skip dried fruit and fruit juices (they have added sugar).
Avoid processed foods. They are loaded with bad fats and carbs, artificial sweeteners, and preservatives.
Avoid high fructose corn syrup. It contributes to insulin resistance. Fructose is converted to fat more than other sweeteners. In fact, HFCS has been linked to obesity. And limit natural sweeteners like sugar and honey.
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