All Posts tagged Posture

Pain & Posture

I’m a world-renowned Chiropractor, specializing in chronic musculoskeletal pain and sports injuries. I teach my patients about exercise, diet and injury prevention. I’m a specialist, an author, a patent holder, and I have a Diplomate Degree in Rehabilitation.

I’ve learned from healthcare professionals, physical therapists, trainers, coaches and other therapists from all over the world since 1982. My methods are a combination of all of my teachers, current research, and my own experiences working with my patients on a day to day basis in the office.

I’ve given hundreds of live presentations to thousands of health professionals in the US, China, Brazil and Canada, and you may have read about some of my pain relief recommendations and exercises in Dynamic Chiropractic, The American Chiropractor magazine, and more.

I enjoy my work helping people overcome acute and chronic pain. I embrace modern day technology for pain relief such as laser therapy, shockwave therapy, Deep Muscle Stimulator and soft tissue techniques.

What I’ve noticed in the medical field, is a lack of one on one attention, understanding, and useful HELP offered to people suffering from muscle and joint pain. I want to make care and treatment simple for people who desperately need it.

If you are not sure what to do, if you don’t know what exercises or movements are OK to do, or you even dread exercise, if you dread taking pain pills, if you can’t do what you want to do, if you feel fatigue or irritated by pain, I want to help you recover what was lost and perform at your peak level.

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Posture and Body Awareness

Day in and day out, we – and our patients – feel rushed and stressed. Is it any wonder we’ve all distanced ourselves from the body’s signals of discomfort in an effort to get things done? Such messages and signals may manifest as a particular ache or in overall stiffness in the body.

As people sit, stand and walk throughout their day, shouldn’t we provide them with greater consciousness of their poor habits?

Faulty Repeated Movements

One of the first important concepts I try to educate patients on is that repeated movements (especially faulty movements) and prolonged postures result in changes in tissues and movement patterns. This results in a segment developing a susceptibility to move in a specific direction, and this may cause pain because of microtrauma from the stress on the tissues.

For example, consider failure of the stability muscle to hold the lower-limb segments in good posture during the stance phase of running or walking. If the gluteus medius, vastus medialis and tibialis posterior are not functioning optimally, there will be an increase in internal rotation of the femur and valgus positioning of the tibiofemoral joint from heel contact to mid-stance phase. The patella will track laterally, leading to an increase in activity of the tensor fascia latae and vastus lateralis, and the foot will excessively pronate. Such faulty mechanics can be the precursor for Achilles tendinopathy, medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) or iliotibial band syndrome.

Read More… http://www.dynamicchiropractic.ca/mpacms/dc_ca/article.php?id=56202

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Corrective Exercises for Excessive Thoracic Kyphosis Posture Evaluations, Part 8

In previous articles, I have written about normal postural alignment versus abnormal postural alignment, and how abnormal postural alignment can be detrimental to muscle function, is aesthetically unpleasing and might contribute to joint pain.

Since kyphosis is natural in the thoracic spine, we have to identify what excessive kyphosis is, which is typically the problem. Generally speaking, normal for a thoracic kyphotic curve measures 30-35.* Excessive kyphosis is greater than 35.* As doctors, we are used to looking at the static spine from the side to determine kyphosis. Using the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) or other movement analysis, we begin to see the interrelationships of muscle and fascial tissue attachments that may contribute to hyperkyphosis.

For treatment of hyperkyphosis, I often take the “bottom up” approach and teach patients how to lengthen the lateral column of the body, the peroneal group, iliotibial band, tensor fascia lata, lateral gluteal complex, quadratus lumborum, oblique complex, latissimus dorsi, and shoulder musculature to influence the kyphosis. When treating hyperkyphosis, always check the flexibility of the ankles, hips, adductors and anterior shoulder complex. The hip flexor tissue is fascially attached to the abdominal fascia, which connects to the external obliques, connecting to the pectorals, joining to the deltoids. As these structures become tight, they can influence thoracic kyphosis.

Read More… http://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=55374

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Functional Movement Analysis (Part 6)

Do you ever feel weird when new patients come in who have been to other chiropractors and say, “Adjustments only provide temporary relief”? I’m sick of hearing it. Don’t get me wrong: I love seeing new patients, but I feel bad that this person almost gave up on chiropractic care altogether! Most chiropractors I meet are warm and caring, and they have a curious presence about them.

There’s also the business side, of course, and I’m just like you: I need new patients and I want them to stick around for the care and treatment they need. Posture analysis, movement analysis and anti-aging strategies are methods I focus on in my “rehab” practice to create long-term relationships. As we walk this pathway and journey of chiropractic – engaging the study of posture – we cross the broad terrain of static posture into functional movements. Using functional movement analysis, I see more clearly who patients are and how their individual range of flexibility and strength within a single body segment is connected to the greater whole.

Read more… http://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=55184

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Scapular Winging (Part 5)

have yet to meet a chiropractor who is not looking for a universally applicable step-by-step treatment approach to help patients reclaim and transform numb, tingling, tight, stiff or painful body parts so they can feel, in each moment, wholeness and well-being.

However, after 28 years in practice, I don’t think there is such a step-by-step treatment approach. I think we develop individual treatment approaches or processes depending on the chiropractor, the patient and the circumstances.

My current treatment approach includes using manipulation/mobilization, warm laser, deep muscle stimulator, fascial release, foam rolling, stretching, muscle activation, core work, and whole-body exercises (often utilizing bands andkettlebells). In the past four articles, I discussed looking more closely at static posture to see what this reveals to assist in our clinical decision process. In the last article, I presented information we can use to look at the shoulder during a static posture evaluation. Now let’s connect what we see in the winged scapula to the corrective exercise strategies we can prescribe for this dysfunction. Please keep in mind that the best exercise you select for your client is the exercise that produces carryover, meaning it improves movement capacity and movement quality, in this case of the scapula.

Read more…. http://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=55067

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Thoracic Spine Posture Evaluations, Part 7

Patients often ask me, “What causes bad posture?” I often hear myself answering with something like, “How many hours do you spend at work each day?” The patient responds with, “On average, about eight to 10 hours,” to which I say: “During your work time, you probably sit unconsciously in a slumped posture and in improper body positions.

Some people just engage in repetitive movements. Either way, this can create muscle imbalances leading to poor posture.” For those patients who really “get it,” I might add, “I think that the mind and body communicate and that psychological distress from work, family, finances (or whatever else I have heard them share with me) shows up in our posture.”

Would you agree that poor self-esteem and depressive symptoms are displayed in our posture? Another cause of poor posture is a lack of a variety of movement in our activities of daily living and overall poor flexibility. In essential ways, our unique cultural, mechanical and spiritual histories are part of what affects overall posture and health.

Last year, I was given the opportunity to teach a thoracic spine rehab course. I had never been to a “thoracic spine seminar,” let alone put together eight hours of teaching material on the subject. The seminar could have been called, “The Thoracic Spine – The Forgotten Area Between the Lumbar Region and the Cervical Region.” I continue to learn the compelling interconnection between the thoracic spine and the cervical and lumbar regions.

Read more… www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=55231

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Winged Scapula – Posture Evaluations, Part 4

Most of the time when we think of a winged scapula, we simply think of weak serratus anterior muscles. But the longer you are in practice, the more you notice posture and become a better “muscle whisperer.” And then you begin to realize so much more. Let’s explore the posture impairment of winged scapula as it relates to the serratus anterior, rhomboids, lower trapezius, and pectoralis muscles.

The biggest tip I can offer you to look for during static posture evaluation for scapular winging is this: If you can see the entire medial border of the shoulder blade, you should suspect serratus anterior dysfunction. If you see only a portion of the medial scapular border or the inferior angle (usually the lower half or third of the medial scapula border), then you should suspect excessive shortness of the pectoralis minor, and lower trapezius and serratus anterior muscle weakness dysfunction. Again, if you only see half or a third of the scapula border protruding away from the rib cage, this is known as “pseudo-winging” and implicates shortness of the pectoralis minor, along with lower trapezius and serratus anterior underactivity or weakness…

Read more… http://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=54964

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The Shoulder and Scapula Posture Evaluation, Part 3

Let’s discuss normal shoulder resting posture so we can determine if there is a link between a postural deviation and pain. Static postural analysis is performed before range-of-motion examinations, orthopedic testing, movement pattern assessments and palpation analysis. When I perform a static posture evaluation, I focus on subtle asymmetries or deviations from normal patterns to aid my diagnostic decisions and treatment transition decisions (passive care to active therapy). I allow myself the time to pause and focus on what I see posturally before beginning other procedures. The changes I see in static posture and functional-movement assessments, visit to visit, help me navigate through the treatment process.

I ask the patient to stand with their shoes off, hands at their sides, in their normal, relaxed position. The evaluation is done with the person in a standing position, which accounts for the normal effect of gravity on the individual. I observe the patient from the front, side and posterior. I look to see the person’s chronic holding patterns.

Look for postural deviations, including forward head, forward shoulders (scapular protraction), humeral internal rotation, and increased thoracic kyphosis. All of these deviations have been implicated in the development of shoulder pain.1-4 

Read More…. http://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=54845

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Improving Posture

Like you, I keep looking for better ways to help patients out of their ill-health predicaments. Specifically, I look for that deep meaning of what the person’s musculoskeletal system is trying to say to me while I look at their posture.

So much gets revealed to me through posture evaluations. Standing in front of us is a person – usually feeling pain, loss, fear and anger, and with or without acceptance of the distortions they have become. I understand; I have fear about losing my ability to be a recreational athlete and move around without pain. The loss of physical function terrifies me. Looking into the eyes of my patient while I begin to look at their posture creates a “real moment.”

Read more: www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=54530  (Posture Evaluations, Part 1)

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