All Posts tagged plantar fascitis

Shockwave Therapy

What are the benefits of the Shockwave Treatment?

Radial shockwave therapy is used to stimulate the body’s natural self-healing process. Most patients experience immediate reduction of pain and improved ease of movement. Shockwave therapy should be tried before costly surgery procedures because it may eliminate your need for surgery. The use of drugs are not needed with this procedure.

How long does the treatment session take?

2000 – 3000 acoustic radial waves are administered per session, which takes approximately 5-10 minutes to apply. After the initial session with Dr. Tucker which includes the evaluation and typically lasts 60 minutes, he will schedule  30 minutes sessions. This allows enough time for questions/answers, and any home therapy recommendations. 

How many treatments will I need?

Normally a series of five treatments are scheduled at 4-5 day intervals; there is a small possibility that an additional 3-5 treatments may be necessary if your condition is very chronic.

Does the treatment hurt?

It is a 5-10 minute treatment that may be uncomfortable to some. Others only feel the sensation of deep percussion and do not express discomfort. Dr. Tucker will do everything possible to make you comfortable and able to tolerate your treatment. However, if you cannot tolerate it, the Dr. Tucker can make adjustments on the machine that can decrease the pressure you feel.

Will it hurt after the treatment?

There may be no immediate pain at all, but some discomfort may be experienced 6 – 12 hours after the treatment. In some cases it can last up to 48 hours and in very rare cases, the pain lasted up to 3 days. Dr. Tucker is using other cutting edge technology (i.e. laser, Deep Muscle Stimulator, lymph drainage) to enhance the effects of the Radial Shock Wave Therapy as well as researching the best methods to decrease post treatment soreness.

What should I do if I am in pain after the treatment?

The shockwave therapy is used to trigger an inflammatory response, which is the body’s natural process of healing. For this reason, do not use anti-inflammatory medications. Do not use ice. The pain should subside within 24 hours.

What if it feels good after the treatment?

Even if it feels good, we recommend decreased activity for 48 hours following the treatment.

Is Shockwave Therapy covered by my insurance?

If you have insurance you will want to ask your provider about the requirements of your coverage. Please call the office at 310-444-9393 with specific questions.

What is the success rate of this kind of treatment?

A successful treatment is considered as a patient having at least 75% reduction in pain within 3 months. The current literature worldwide, suggests success rates are around 80 to 90%.

What if it doesn’t work for me?

Although the short-term effects alone are exceptional, the long-term benefits of this treatment may take up to 3-4 months. If after this time there has not been any marked improvement, we will discuss further treatment options.

Are there contraindications and/or precautions?

Yes! Contraindications

  •          Coagulation disorders, thrombosis, heart or circulatory patients
    • Use of anticoagulants, especially Marcumar, Heparin, Coumadin
    • Tumour diseases, carcinoma, cancer patients
    • Pregnancy
    • Polyneuropathy in case of diabetes mellitus
    • Acute inflammations / pus focus in the target area
    • Children in growth
    • Cortisone therapy up to 6 weeks before first treatment
    • Blood or nerves supplies too close to the affected area

Side effects

  •           Swelling, reddening, haematomas
    • Petechiae
    • Pain
    • Skin lesions after previous cortisone therapy

These side effects generally abate after 5 to 10 days.

We are happy to discuss your case with you. Please call the office at 310-444-9393

 

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Plantar fascitis & foot pronation

Plantar fasciitis or heel spurs are common in sports which involve running, dancing or jumping. Runners who excessively pronate (feet rolling in or flattening) are particularly at risk as the biomechanics of the foot pronating causes additional stretching of the plantar fascia.

Symptoms: A chronic mild ankle sprain could have symptoms related to stretching of the ankle ligaments; mild pain; mild swelling on the outside of the ankle; some joint stiffness or difficulty walking or running.

Plantar fascitis can be heel pain, under the heel and usually on the inside, at the origin of the attachment of the fascia. Sometimes there may also be pain along the outside border of the heel. This may occur due to the offloading the painful side of the heel by walking on the outside border of the foot. It may also be associated with the high impact of landing on the outside of the heel if you have high arched feet. Pain is usually worse first thing in the morning. After a few minutes it eases as the foot gets warmed up, but can get worse again during the day especially if walking a lot. 

How to best treat and prevent this from happening again: Rest until it is not painful. It can be very difficult to rest the foot as most people will be on their feet during the day for work. By walking on the painful foot you are continually aggravating the injury and increasing inflammation. However a good plantar fascitis taping technique can help the foot get the rest it needs by supporting the plantar fascia.

Cold therapy can be applied regularly until symptoms have resolved.

Stretching the calfs and plantar fascia is an important part of treatment and prevention. Simply reducing pain and inflammation alone is unlikely to result in long term recovery. The plantar fascia tightens up making the origin at the heel more susceptible to becoming inflamed. Tightening of the plantar fascia happens in particular over night which is why pain is often worse in the morning. A plantar fascia night splint is an excellent product which is worn over night and gently stretches the calf muscles and plantar fascia preventing it from tightening up overnight.

Arch supports or custom made orthotics are often required.

In office treatment includes using the warm laser, the Deep Muscle Stimulator (DMS), or the ‘scrapping’ tools called Graston or SASTM. I like to use K-tape as well.

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