All Posts tagged Laser Therapy

Knee Pain

First, laser the knee area. Laser is a deep heat that does provide pain relief.

Next lets talk about weight loss if needed. Every pound you lose reduces stress across the knee by 3-4 pounds, even higher if you climb stairs or attempt to run. Don’t run, jump, or do anything that involves impact to your knee.

Next lets talk about natural remedies like fish oil and Bosweillia as effective and helpful. Use BioFreeze cream to rub on the knee! Let me put kinesio-tape on your knee.

Next let me teach you the proper exercises. The best long-term method to relieve pain and restore function is consistent low impact exercise. Exercises that stretch and strengthen the muscles around the knee, not only provide support and maintain motion of the joint, but stimulate endorphins and intrinsic growth hormone release — both of which help to relieve the pain of arthritis.

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Laser Therapy

The goal of laser therapy is to deliver light energy units from infrared laser radiation, called photons, to damaged cells. The consensus of experts is that photons absorbed by the cells through laser therapy stimuate the mitochondria to accelerate production of ATP. This biochemical increase in cell energy is used to transform live cells from a state of illness to a stable, healthy state.

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Laser Therapy for Pain

Laser Therapy continues to be a large part of my treatment program. Laser is highly effective in the treatment of soft tissue and sports injuries, wound healing, dermatological conditions, musculoskeletal problems, as well as a number of conditions you might not even think  about going to a chiropractor for. 

Many practitioners and lay people are unaware of the extensive applications of Laser Therapy. I will definitely continue to use laser on my  patients.

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Laser Treatments

Laser therapy has been around for a long time but it is considered cutting edge treatment for musculoskeletal injuries and pain.
Laser therapy stimulates cellular activity, expediting the healing processes to reduce inflammation and repair damaged tissue. 

You can feel the warm deep tissue penetration. This deep heat significantly increases the body’s cellular production of ATP (Adenosine-triphosphate) to reduce inflammation and heal the inflamed area.

Here are some of the benefits of using the deep tissue penetration that laser provides safely and effectively:

Healing and pain relief with no side effects, drug interaction effects, or invasive surgery.

Treats acute and chronic conditions as well as post surgical pain.

Pain relief is often felt immediately.

Most laser treatments take only 10-20 minutes.

Are you a potential candidate?

  • If you have pain that is of musculo-skeletal origin, laser therapy may be for you:
    This includes sports injuries, back and neck pain, any joint pain (knee, shoulder, ankle, etc), bursitis, tendonitis, tennis elbow, contusions, strains and sprains, carpal tunnel syndrome, chondromalacia patellae, arthritis, fibromyalgia, heel spurs, plantar fascitis, migraine headaches, neck pain/whiplash, nerve root pain, postoperative pain, repetitive stress injuries, TM joint pain and more.
  • If you have the wound that is slow to heal and has been resistant to treatment, you may be a candidate for laser therapy. This includes slow healing fractures, as well as soft tissue injuries and ulcers.
  • If you have multiple trigger points (sore spots in the muscles) that do not go away, you may be a candidate for laser therapy. This includes areas associated with fibromyalgia.
  • If you have had Prolotherapy or PRP, and wish to accelerate the response of healing, you may be a candidate for laser therapy. This includes any area that has been treated with Prolotherapy/PRP injections.
  • If you need Prolotherapy or PRP therapy but are afraid of needles, you may be a candidate for laser therapy.
  • Laser therapy stimulates the same areas that Prolotherapy targets. It does it without needles, but requires a lot more time and repeated treatments to gain the result that can be gotten from Prolotherapy and laser together.

Feel free to call me directly at 310-473-2911 or call my cell phone at 310-339-0442

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Laser treatment

I use High Power Laser Therapy (7.5 watts). Laser stimulation has been shown to increase blood flow and lymphatic drainage while, at the same time, stimulating endorphin and enkephalin release for pain management. Stimulation with laser reduces inflammation, and promotes nerve regeneration.

High Power Laser Therapy has the ability to reach deep within the body when compared to Low Level Laser Therapy. Laser energy apperas to also biostimulate collagen and fibroblast growth.

I usually use the laser in combination with hands-on therapy and I often use the Deep Muscle Stimulator (DMS) as well. Exercises are taught based on the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and squat evaluation.

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Laser Therapy May Improve Outcomes in Fibromyalgia

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/723164?sssdmh=dm1.621178&src=nldne&uac=15003AN

June 8, 2010 (Baltimore, Maryland) — New data presented at the American College of Sports Medicine 57th Annual Meeting suggest that the application of class 4 infrared light lasers to fibromyalgia trigger points improves upper body flexibility. This finding is important because fibromyalgia is often difficult to treat with pharmacologic agents, and patients seek alternative regimens to ease their discomfort.

39 women (52 ± 11 years of age) were randomly assigned to receive 8 minutes of laser therapy or sham heat therapy twice per week for 4 weeks. Treatment consisted of the application of laser therapy or sham heat therapy to 8 standardized points located across the neck, shoulders, and low back.

The impact of laser therapy on upper body flexibility in patients treated with laser therapy was significant, compared with those treated with sham heat therapy. However, there was no improvement in functionality or pain score between the 2 groups. There was an increase in the amount of time between bouts of severe pain in laser-treated patients, compared with sham-treated patients.

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Laser Therapy

Laser therapy is effective for degenerative osteoarthritis
Stelian J, Gil I, Habot B et al. Improvement of pain and disability in elderly patients with degenerative osteoarthritis of the knee treated with narrow-band light therapy. J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992; 40: 23-26.

In an Israeli study the effect of laser therapy in degenerative osteoarthritis (DOA) of the knee was investigated in a double blind study among 50 patients. One group received infrared (GaAlAs) and one red (HeNe) laser. Only the first group could be blinded, while the latter was open. Patients were treated twice daily, 15 minutes each time, for 10 days. The patients treated themselves after instruction. Total dose for each session was 10.3 J for red and 11.1 for infrared. Continuous mode was used for 7.5 minutes, pulsed for 7.5 minutes, rationale not stated. There was a significant pain reduction in the laser groups as compared to the placebo groups. There was no significant difference between the red and the infrared group. The Disability Index Questionnaire also revealed an improvement in the laser groups. All patients in the placebo group required analgesics within two months after laser therapy while the patients in the laser group were pain free ranging from 2 months to 1 year.

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Laser therapy

The Effect of Low-Level Laser in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial
Béla Hegedűs, László Viharos, Mihály Gervain, Márta Gálfi. Photomedicine and Laser Surgery. August 2009, 27(4): 577-584. doi:10.1089/pho.2008.2297.
Published in Volume: 27 Issue 4: August 20, 2009 Online Ahead of Print: June 16, 2009

Introduction: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is thought to have an analgesic effect as well as a biomodulatory effect on microcirculation. This study was designed to examine the pain-relieving effect of LLLT and possible microcirculatory changes measured by thermography in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA).
Materials and Methods: Patients with mild or moderate KOA were randomized to receive either LLLT or placebo LLLT. Treatments were delivered twice a week over a period of 4wk with a diode laser (wavelength 830nm, continuous wave, power 50mW) in skin contact at a dose of 6J/point. The placebo control group was treated with an ineffective probe (power 0.5mW) of the same appearance. Before examinations and immediately, 2wk, and 2 mo after completing the therapy, thermography was performed (bilateral comparative thermograph by AGA infrared camera); joint flexion, circumference, and pressure sensitivity were measured; and the visual analogue scale was recorded.
Results: In the group treated with active LLLT, a significant improvement was found in pain (before treatment [BT]: 5.75; 2 mo after treatment : 1.18); circumference (BT: 40.45; AT: 39.86); pressure sensitivity (BT: 2.33; AT: 0.77); and flexion (BT: 105.83; AT: 122.94). In the placebo group, changes in joint flexion and pain were not significant. Thermographic measurements showed at least a 0.5°C increase in temperature—and thus an improvement in circulation compared to the initial values. In the placebo group, these changes did not occur.
Conclusion: Our results show that LLLT reduces pain in KOA and improves microcirculation in the irradiated area.

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