All Posts tagged hs-CRP

I want all my patients to have a hs-CRP blood test

Elevations in CRP suggest increased risk of cardio-vascular disease. 

 

If it is elevated, I would recommend Omega-3 fatty acid (fish oil). his is a natural intervention for the treatment and prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD). Certain omega-3 fatty acids have biochemical properties that promote atherosclerotic plaque stability and thereby decrease the incidence of cardiac ischemia and  ischemic cardiac arrhythmias. An ever-increasing body of evidence supports the role for omega-3 fatty acids, i.e. fish oil, in  through a role as anti-arrhythmic agents, through anti-thrombotic effect, and through atherosclerotic plaque stabilization, probably as a result of topical anti-inflammatory action.

 

 

Dosage requirement is between 2 and 3 grams per day, in divided doses.  Generally, the preferred cardiac ratio of 3:2 EPA/DHA, but in inflammatory conditions the EPA/DHA ratio does a bit better at 6:1.

 

I recommend either EPA-DHA 720 or EPA-DHA 6:1 enteric coated. These can be purchased on the Metagenics link.

 

 

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Inflammation & Food Allergies

By Dr. Jeffrey Tucker
Everyone is talking about the detrimental effects of low-grade systemic inflammation. Inflammation is involved in a variety of conditions from neurological to degenerative conditions, and is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

Low-grade systemic inflammation can be measured easily with the inflammatory biomarker called ‘highly sensitive C-reactive protein’ (hs-CRP). This is the same marker used as a cardiovascular risk factor, and is an inexpensive blood test that you can ask your Doctor for.

Inflammation is important and appropriate to produce an effective immune response when needed to eliminate pathogens and illness. But chronic low grade systemic inflammation is tissue-destructive, and cardiovascular tissue, joint tissue and muscle tissue is no exception.

Men with the highest level of C-reactive protein (CRP) showed in a study to have three times the incidence of myocardial infarction and two times the incidence of ischemic stroke when compared with men having the lowest level.

Low grade inflammation causing joint aches & pains, as well as difficulty losing weight may be due to the fact that you are eating foods that you’re allergic to! Food allergies that you are unaware of can also be responsible for a number of health issues including gas, bloat, fatigue, rashes, irritable bowel type symptoms and migraine headaches. When chronic pain patients come see me, I am very interested to hear about there responses to certain foods.

Patients who struggle with trying to lose extra weight may have food allergies as well.

One of the most allergic foods and therefore a high inflammation producer is dairy. Many patients are sensitive to dairy and don’t know it. Even those on a low carb diet, which I strongly advocate, may have switched to eating more dairy. You may need to perform a trial of cutting out cow’s milk, cheeses, and dairy products altogether to see how you feel.

There are seven foods responsible for almost all food allergies — wheat, peanuts, other tree nuts like walnuts, fish/shellfish, soybeans, eggs, and cow’s milk. For most of my clients, I usually start with limiting eating wheat and cow’s milk dairy. Why? Through years of clinical practice, I have found that wheat and dairy are usually the most problematic. Avoid breads, crackers, cereals, and chips that contain wheat. You can try goat and sheep’s milk dairy products. I find that food allergies and the excess inflammation in patients body contributes to weight gain, joint aches & chronic pains.

I don’t want you to feel hungry but I want you to have a food plan to promote your optimal health. I recommend medical foods called the UltraInflamX shake to help reduce inflammation in the body. www.Meta-ehealth.com/site/office/index.jsp to order.
References
http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/545808/
Kagan RS (February 2003). Environ. Health Perspect. 111; (2): 223–5.
Zar S, et al. (July 2005). Scand. J. Gastroenterol. 40 (7): 800–7.
Arroyave-Hernandez CM, et al. Rev Alerg Mex. 2007 Sept-Oct; 54(4):162-8.

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