All Posts tagged High Blood Pressure

High Blood Pressure Risk Update

A rise in blood pressure during middle age significantly raises the risk of having a heart attack or a stroke during a person’s lifetime, report Northwestern University School of Medicine (Illinois, USA) researchers. Norrina Allen and colleagues analyzed data from 61,585 participants in the Cardiovascular Lifetime Risk Pooling Project. Starting with baseline blood pressure readings at age 41, researchers measured blood pressure again at age 55, then followed the patients until the occurrence of a first heart attack or stroke, death or age 95.

Men who developed high blood pressure in middle age or who started out with high blood pressure had a 70% risk of having a heart attack or stroke, compared to a 41% risk for men who maintained low blood pressure or whose blood pressure decreased during the time period.

Women who developed high blood pressure had almost a 50% risk of a heart attack or stroke, compared to a 22% risk for those who kept their blood pressure low or saw a decrease.

People that maintain or reduce their blood pressure to normal levels by age 55 have the lowest lifetime risk for a heart attack or a stroke.

I urge my patient’s to prevent high blood pressure through exercise, diet and nutrition efforts. I will be happy to discuss this with you.

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Effects of the dietary approaches to stop hypertension diet, exercise, and caloric restriction on neurocognition in overweight adults with high blood pressure.

Smith PJ, Blumenthal JA, Babyak MA, Craighead L, Welsh-Bohmer KA, Browndyke JN, Strauman TA, Sherwood A.  Effects of the dietary approaches to stop hypertension diet, exercise, and caloric restriction on neurocognition in overweight adults with high blood pressure.  Hypertension. 2010 Jun;55(6):1331-8

“High blood pressure increases the risks of stroke, dementia, and neurocognitive dysfunction. Although aerobic exercise and dietary modifications have been shown to reduce blood pressure, no randomized trials have examined the effects of aerobic exercise combined with dietary modification on neurocognitive functioning in individuals with high blood pressure (ie, prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension). As part of a larger investigation, 124 participants with elevated blood pressure (systolic blood pressure 130 to 159 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure 85 to 99 mm Hg) who were sedentary and overweight or obese (body mass index: 25 to 40 kg/m(2)) were randomized to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet alone, DASH combined with a behavioral weight management program including exercise and caloric restriction, or a usual diet control group. Participants completed a battery of neurocognitive tests of executive function-memory-learning and psychomotor speed at baseline and again after the 4-month intervention. Participants on the DASH diet combined with a behavioral weight management program exhibited greater improvements in executive function-memory-learning (Cohen’s D=0.562; P=0.008) and psychomotor speed (Cohen’s D=0.480; P=0.023), and DASH diet alone participants exhibited better psychomotor speed (Cohen’s D=0.440; P=0.036) compared with the usual diet control. Neurocognitive improvements appeared to be mediated by increased aerobic fitness and weight loss. Also, participants with greater intima-medial thickness and higher systolic blood pressure showed greater improvements in executive function-memory-learning in the group on the DASH diet combined with a behavioral weight management program. In conclusion, combining aerobic exercise with the DASH diet and caloric restriction improves neurocognitive function among sedentary and overweight/obese individuals with prehypertension and hypertension.

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Blood Pressure Benefits of Cocoa

Cardiovascular benefits of cocoa.

Activity of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)—a target for blood pressure medication—was significantly inhibited by dark chocolate containing 72% cocoa, with the degree of inhibition dependent upon the genotype of the human subjects, according to new findings published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology. ACE inhibitors work by inhibiting the conversion of angiotensin I to the potent vasoconstrictor, angiotensin II, thereby improving blood flow and blood pressure.

The new study, led by scientists from the Faculty of Health Sciences at Linkoping University in Sweden, found that cocoa’s effect upon ACE activity was also related to ACE genotype, with ACE inhibition reduced by 21% in ACE I/I and 28% in ACE D/D three hours after consumption. The study deepens our understanding of the potential cardiovascular benefits of cocoa and the compounds it contains.

In terms of blood pressure, a meta-analysis by researchers from the University Hospital of Cologne found that consumption of cocoa had significant positive effects on hypertension. Writing in the Archives of Internal Medicine (2007, Vol. 167, pp. 626-634), the Cologne-based scientists stated: “The magnitude of the hypotensive effects of cocoa is clinically noteworthy; it is in the range that is usually achieved with monotherapy of beta-blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.” The majority of science into the potential benefits of cocoa have revolved around cardiovascular benefits of the flavanols (also known as flavan-3-ols or catechins) and particularly the monomeric flavanol (-) epicatechin.

For the new study, Ingrid Persson and her co-workers recruited 16 volunteers aged between 20 and 45, and asked them to eat 75 grams of dark chocolate with 72% cocoa content every day for two weeks. Results showed a significant inhibition of ACE activity, with a reduction of about 18% observed between before and after the cocoa intake. Such a reduction is equivalent to those observed with antihypertensive medications, said the researchers. “Our results indicate that lifestyle changes, with the help of foods that contain high catechin and procyanidin content, prevent cardiovascular disease,” said Dr. Persson. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology 57(1):44-50, 2011

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Whey Protein Helps Lower Blood Pressure

Whey protein beverages reduced blood pressure in young men and women in a six-week controlled intervention. A study out of Washington State University found that daily consumption of whey protein resulted in at least a six-point reduction in average blood pressure of women and men who had pre-existing high blood pressure.

This study is published in the International Dairy Journal. Whey protein as in UltraMeal is low-cost and has not been linked to any adverse effects. I recommend at least 2 scops daily. I order my whey proteain from Metagenics at www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com 

High blood pressure is often referred to as the “silent killer” as it typically does not present with any symptoms. However, high blood pressure is strongly correlated with stroke risk, as well as risk of heart disease, the nation’s number-one killer. Risk factors for high blood pressure include: age, black race, family history, obesity or overweight, lack of exercise, smoking, a high sodium diet, inadequate potassium and vitamin D, heavy drinking and emotional stress. High blood pressure can also lead to an aneurysm, heart failure, kidney problems, vision loss, metabolic syndrome (which can lead to type 2 diabetes) and memory problems.

International Dairy Journal 20(11):753-760, 2010

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Coffee news!

This study out of the University of Athens (Greece),  analyzed hypertension (high blood pressure) and coffee consumption. Hypertension makes blood vessels less responsive to signals to expand and is a significant predictor of cardiovascular events. They studies the coffee consumption patterns among 435 hypertensive individuals, ages 65 to 100 years, enrolled in a larger study involving the permanent inhabitants of Ikaria Island, where many residents reach 90 years and older.  As compared to those who rarely drank coffee, moderate consumption of one or two cups a day associated with a lower prevalence of diabetes, lower prevalence of high cholesterol, lower body mass index, lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease, and higher values of aortic distensibility.  Proposing that the presence of phenol compounds in coffee may be responsible for these effects, the researchers conclude that: “Moderate coffee consumption has beneficial effects on the aortic distensibility in hypertensive elderly individuals.”

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Soy Isoflavones reduce cholesterol levels, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, blood pressure and endothelial function

Supplementation with soy isoflavones could improve blood vessel endothelial cell function and reduce cardiovascular disease risk factors, according to a new study in the journal Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases. Isoflavones supplementation has a valuable benefit on endothelial function.

“…exposure to soy isoflavones can modestly, but significantly, improve endothelial function” reported the researchers.

Soy foods have been shown to reduce cholesterol levels, with recent evidence suggesting that isoflavones could reduce other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, such as blood pressure and endothelial function.

Endothelial dysfunction signifies the early stages of heart disease and is a predictive marker for long-term CVD and mortality.

Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery is used as an assessment tool for endothelial function. Impaired FMD response is a CVD risk factor and can precede clinically symptomatic CVD by many years.

The significant improvement in FMD observed in response to isolated isoflavone exposure is within the range deemed clinically relevant, “thereby indicating that exposure to isoflavone supplements may beneficially influence vascular health,” added the authors.

Researchers stated the key mechanism behind endothelial dysfunction involves the impaired release of nitric oxide (NO), causing blood vessels to constrict. Increased availability of isoflavone is suggested to increase NO production.

Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases Published online ahead of print

UltraMeal Plus 360 provides soy isoflavones to provide nutritional support for the management of metabolic syndrome & CVD. Check out the multiple flavor options @ www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com
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Eat Fat To Lose Fat?

This continues to be a big topic. I am all about helping clients reduce body fat, heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, and dementia. It’s true, daily consumption of saturated fats (like coconut oil) can help reduce abdominal fat which helps reduce your risk of these other diseases.

I recommend a whey protein powder by Metagenics called UltraMeal Plus 360 as a shake in the morning. I also recommend Meta Lipoate 300. I always tell clients that they have to stay on this program for at least for 12 weeks (daily shakes of UltraMeal Plus 360). Follow a balanced, low-carb diet with increased protein and fiber intake, start exercising with a 20-30 minute walk each day and I know changes will take place.

Bad LDL cholesterol and good HDL cholesterol levels improve,
body mass index improves, waistlines look better.

Don’t be skeptical about saturated fat!

What I am seeing is that people who eat the most saturated fat, the most cholesterol and the most protein calories weigh the least. I get my clients more physically active and they have the ideal serum cholesterol levels.

Animal fats are not bad for you. They boost your energy and your immunity. They help your body build stronger and more resilient cells. They contain chemicals that help your brain stay focused, and even contain concentrated levels of ‘good’ HDL cholesterol.

Let’s discuss your specific needs!

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BP Drops when Sugary Drinks Are Reduced

Cutting down on sugar-sweetened soft drinks was associated with a drop in blood pressure, researchers found. In a cohort of U.S. adults, those who reduced daily intake of the beverages saw a significant drop in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

full story http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/Hypertension/tb/20264

Many clients with High Blood Pressure are helped by eating a low-glycemic-index dietary food plan and exercise program while incorporating medical foods and nutritional supplements. A low glycemic diet is more effective than a low fat diet in treating obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes.

The specific medical food I use is called UltraMeal® Plus 360 — 2 scoops twice daily
UltraMeal Plus 360 is a medical food formulated to provide specialized, multi-mechanistic
nutritional support for patients with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease by supplying a combination of acacia extract, reduced iso-alpha acids (RIAA), plant sterols, and heart-healthy soy protein and isoflavones.

EPA-DHA Extra Strength® — 2 to 4 softgels twice daily. This is a concentrated and stabilized purity-certified, Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Nano Cell Q10— 1-2 tablespoons daily. Nano Cell Q10 is all natural coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) manufactured to achieve exquisite quality, purity, and bioavailability. COQ10 depletion is well documented in animal and human studies with detrimental cardiac consequences in both animal models and human trials. Deficiency is also implicated in increased incidence of cataracts, neoplasia, peripheral neuropathies, and some psychiatric disturbances.
ORDER these products by clicking on the Metagenics link

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High Blood Pressure Supplements

What YOU Can Do To Bring Your Blood Pressure Down
I do think regular Chiropractic Adjustments helps – this maintains vital nerve flow to the cardiovascular system; reduces mechanical stress to the nervous system; enhances all nutritional and dietary suggestions by allowing for optimal assimilation.

Lose 5-10 pounds because excess weight can often lead to increased blood pressure.

Give up “empty” calories like sugar, white bread, cake, cookies, pie, hard alcohol.

Try eating more fish, lean meat, vegetables, use butter, and eggs are OK.

Avoid corn and corn syrup (liquid corn oil, fructose corn syrup, etc).

Cut Down on Salt. Try to decrease the salt you add while cooking and not add any salt at the table. Avoid salt-loaded foods, such as chips, crackers, and canned foods high in sodium. Instead of salt, try cooking with other flavorings such as lemon juice, mint, mustard, herbs, curry, etc. Use your imagination!

Get More Exercise. Walk up and down stairs rather than taking the elevator. Walk the few blocks to the store rather than hopping in the car, etc. Try to be physically active every day, and be more intense about it.

Control Your Caffeine Intake – Coffee, tea, colas, and analgesics contain caffeine which can elevate blood pressure. A cup or two of coffee is not harmful, it contains lots of antioxidants.

Increase Consumption of Calcium, Garlic, Magnesium, Potassium-Rich Foods. Studies show that calcium, magnesium, garlic, and potassium may be more helpful in lowering blood pressure than salt restriction.

Increase Omega-3 Fatty Acids. Studies indicate that oils in fish may help lower blood pressure.

High blood pressure is a dangerous disease. If not brought under control, it can lead to strokes and heart attacks.

Here is a list of the supplements I recommend: You can order these from my website @ www.DrJeffreyTucker.com and link to Metagenics. They will mail these to you.

Wellness Essentials for Men/women formula — 2 packets daily

Vasotensin — 2 tablets twice daily with food. Vasotensin provides active peptides from bonito fish to help prevent the formation of angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, through their interaction with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). This activity supports healthy vascular function for optimal blood flow and healthy blood pressure levels.

NanaoCellQ — 1 teasspoon 1-2 times daily with meals. Highly Absorbable Coenzyme Q10 with Natural Vitamin E. Studies show that CoQ10 deficiency is present in 39% of people with hypertension. CoQ10 lowers blood pressure by lowering cholesterol levels and stabilizing the vascular membrane via its antioxidant properties.

Cardiogenics Intensive Care — 1-2 tablets 2 times daily between meals with juice. Nutritional support for healthy circulation and cardiac function. Calcium has been shown in studies to not only lower blood pressure, but also to help to prevent it. Some scientists have stated that calcium counteracts the effects that sodium has on blood pressure. Magnesium is another valuable mineral for controlling hypertension. Numerous studies show that magnesium has a positive effect on hypertension. It works by relaxing and smoothing the muscle of blood vessels and also plays a role in cell membrane permeability to sodium and calcium. Potassium is perhaps the best-known natural remedy for lowering blood pressure. One study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that low potassium levels contribute to the development of hypertension.

ActiFolate — 6-12 tablets daily with food. Actifolate is comprehensive folate nutrition in the active forms. Several studies have demonstrated that high-dose folic acid acutely lowers blood pressure and enhances coronary vasodilator function in patients with coronary artery disease.

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