All Posts tagged glutathione

The King of Antioxidants

This antioxidant keeps you healthy by boosting your immune system. Your own body produces but as you age, your body produces less of it. This super antioxidant is called glutathione. It is formed from proteins and amino acids. And it contains sulfur chemical groups. Glutathione attracts and traps toxins and free radicals in your body… and then flushes them out.

How Glutathione Works

It helps boost all the other antioxidants. Glutathione repairs free radical damage. It protects our cells and maintains healthy energy metabolism. Plus, it’s always working to detox our bodies. All the toxins in our bodies stick to glutathione, and it transports them into bile and waste… which we excrete from our bodies.

But again as we age… or get bombarded with toxins and oxidative stress, our glutathione levels weaken, we can’t flush out toxins… or fight free radicals or infection.  A leading medical journal reports that the lowest levels of glutathione levels are found in hospitalized seniors. The highest levels are recorded in healthy young people who exercise regularly and live a healthy lifestyle.

There are three options for increasing your levels. These include diet, exercise, and supplements.

Plenty of healthy foods help your body to produce more glutathione.

The best foods are those rich in sulfur. Your best bets are garlic, onions, and cruciferous vegetables. These include:

  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Collards
  • Kale
  • Watercress

Daily exercise helps your body to produce more glutathione. Modest cardio exercise combined with light resistance training can help you kick-start production.

Start with 20 minutes of cardio, every day. You can try 20 minutes of any activity that appeals to you, including:

  • Biking
  • Jogging
  • Running
  • Swimming

On alternate days, he recommends 15 – 20 minutes of light strength-training exercises. 

Five Supplements to Boost Your Levels

The five best supplements that boost glutathione production include:

1. Methylation nutrients. These nutrients are your best option for boosting glutathione production. They include folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12. When taking these supplements, you should make sure that you take folate in the active form of 5 methyltetrahydrofolate; B6 in the active form of P5P; and B12 in the active form of methylcobalamin.

2. Alpha lipoic acid. This is an essential supplement for cell health. It boosts energy production and detoxes your body. It also controls blood sugar and protects your brain. While our bodies make this nutrient naturally, our levels decrease under stress.

3. Selenium. This mineral helps to produce new glutathione.

4. Vitamins C and E. Both of these antioxidants, when working together, help to boost glutathione’s ability to recycle other antioxidants.

5. Milk thistle. This simple herb not only boosts glutathione levels… it also fights liver disease.

When taken together, these supplements help to rebuild your glutathione levels. And high glutathione levels are your best defense against disease and aging.

Go to www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-health.com  to order supplements that contain the right anti-oxidants.

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Anti-aging Nutrition

What helps certain mice to live so much longer than other mice?

Some research suggests lacking growth hormone allows them to live so long. A lack of growth hormone means there is no demand to make protein and turn amino acid into muscle; this frees the mice, metabolically, to fight off internal and external stresses.

I have read some material that suggests we concentrate our attention to methionine metabolism. This essential amino acid is critical for protein synthesis and growth, and is also integral to metabolism. Also Glutathione, an important antioxidant, is generated by the methionine (MET) pathway. Glutathione is made up of three amino acids, the key one in these studies is cysteine. The essential amino acids, MET and cysteine, can be easily modified in the diet.

Certain mice have highly active methionine metabolism but when they are given growth hormone, this activity goes down. Methionine metabolism is regulated by growth hormone.

Calorie restriction (CR) is well known to extend lifespan in multiple species. It has also been shown that restricting MET intake (without CR) extends the lifespan of rats and mice. There are similarities in mice subjected to CR and the dwarf mice which suggests there are common underlying factors that lead to slower aging.

The mechanisms leading to this potential `slower’ aging and lifespan extension are unknown.

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