All Posts tagged Dr. Jeffrey Tucker

Thera-band Consecutive Loops – Dr. Tucker’s Review

There are tremendous benefits to patients doing band work. For years we have had tubing, tubing with handles, Thera-bands, loops, the Stretch strap, and now the Consecutive Loop (CLX) Theraband. In my office patients are being introduced to the CLX along with bodyweight exercises before using free weights or Kettlebells. Patients are instructed to perform bodyweight workouts and then they try doing it with the new CLX Thera-bands. There is a difference between the CLX movement and bodyweight only maneuvers and I notice patients are surprised at the difference between the two sensations. The obvious things patients notice when training with CLX is a difference in the sensation of more muscle recruitment, breathing becomes deeper, and heart beats go up. The CLX creates more intensity and it seems obvious that the energy expenditure of the CLX workout is greater than the bodyweight workout alone.

One of the biggest advantages of using CLX is the way I can cue patients to apply compressive forces (increases muscular response and promotes stability) as well as traction (increases muscular response and promotes movement) forces to act on the body while having it wrapped around a foot or hand. Wrapping a CLX band around the feet and hands while performing a squat or lunge is a fun challenge and causes the body to increase more muscle activation.

All rehab and exercise tools are not the same. If space is an issue in your office, all you need to get started with the CLX is about a 6’x 6’ space. Patients can benefit from CLX training without ever graduating to free weights or Kettlebell drills. One-arm CLX training is great unto itself. Further, many classic band exercises, such as pushes and pulls are great for flexibility, strength and cardio fitness. Static holding of poses with CLX resistance is a great way to increase strength through the upper body and trunk.

The new CLX Theraband is different and it provides patients with the variety they need to stay engaged in therapy.  After a few sessions you will see very different results and realize the unique attributes the CLX can bring to your in-office rehab training. CLX bands are absolutely the first place Doctors and patients can apply themselves to learning proper band technique. For in office training and at home follow up therapy the CLX is definitely the way to go!  Bottom line? You can certainly get fit and strong with one single 3-5 foot long CLX Theraband.

 

More

Thera-band Launches CLX

In January 2015 Thera-Band will launch the CLX.

Dr. Jeffrey Tucker requested that Thera-band make a continuous loop band like the Stretch Strap and in 2014 they gave Dr. Tucker a prototype. He has been beta testing the CLX for a year before the ‘launch’ in his private practice in Los Angeles, CA. He put together routines based on traditional band and bodyweight training.

Dr. Tucker says “I combined my knowledge of anatomy and movement  into progressive CLX training” for my patients”. Dr. Tucker has 30 years of experience teaching patients flexibility and strength training. CLX represents an evolved fusion of the Thera-band Stretch Strap and Dr. Tucker’s fascial knowledge and bodyweight strength methods.

Many techniques are combined using the CLX – fascial stretch, PNF, muscle release techniques, static stretch techniques along with proper form and progressions.

“Those doctors, patients and athletes familiar with CLX will be ahead of the pack.  Come in and visit me to learn bleeding-edge exercises, new approaches, next-gen thinking in band training and therapy.”

More

Laser Therapy

By Jeffrey Tucker, DC, DACRB

Therapeutic lasers are used for three primary indications: eliminating pain, reducing inflammation and accelerating tissue healing. There are different types of light forces such as LED’s, low powered lasers and high powered lasers or “super-pulsed” lasers.

I have more than five years of experience using a Class IV laser and, more recently, decided to add the Class IIIB in my practice. My choice to add a Class IIIB laser had to do with the depth of penetration and the ability to use laser without having to move the handle around on the patient’s dermis without fear of it getting too hot and burning the patient.

We are all familiar with going to the market, buying a light bulb, usually anywhere from 25 to 100 Watts. We’ve placed that bulb in the socket and felt the heat it generates. I’m sure your fingers have experienced the burn by that heat. Laser light is a type and source of energy that can generate heat. The light must be absorbed in order for a photo chemical reaction to take place. For my practice, I need a device that can penetrate this light source deep into the hips, shoulders, knees, low back, etc. The Class IIIB is able to penetrate four inches of tissue, whereas other light products with the low powered LED do not have the power in order to penetrate sufficient depth of tissue. If you are dealing with more acute injuries or superficial injuries, these systems would be fine, but if you are dealing with deeper tissues or more chronic conditions, you are going to need more powerful systems.

There are two methodologies used to increase power. One is the Watts. There are lasers that use a “super-pulsed” technology with a very high impulse function of 50 Watts across the laser diode. Remember what a 50 Watt light bulb would feel like on your fingers once it’s in the socket! So, for a fraction of a second there is 50 Watts of power at that tissue surface. This “super-pulsed” function is what allows the practitioner to hold the handle of the laser in one place without a hot burning sensation and for the light to penetrate up to four inches into tissues. We cannot leave 50 Watts of continuous power on the same spot of tissue because it would burn a hole through the patient. The “super-pulsed” delivery method provides an average power of 100 mWatts. The maximum permissible tissue exposure is 500 mW depending on the wavelength.

The second important method to increase power is getting light of the right color. Photochemists typically work in only a few sections of the electromagnetic spectrum. Some of the most widely used sections, and their wavelengths, are the following: Ultraviolet: 100–400nm; Visible Light: 400–700nm; Near infrared: 700–2500nm.

The class IV laser companies try to increase the power because they feel that more power is better. They are right up to a certain extent, once they go above 500 mWatt (half of watt), they now exceed the maximum tissue exposure and the Class IV lasers will deliver heat to tissues which is why they have to defocus the beams or use the roller tract ball at the end of the laser handle. The advantage of a roller ball or tract ball is that you can perform fascial release during the laser treatment. Again, the disadvantage to the class IV laser is that the practitioner has to keep the light moving otherwise if they hold it in one place it will burn the patient. The important thing about how lasers work is to get the right light wavelength down into the tissues.

All lasers (class I, class III, class IV), are tools that emit light and work on the ATP pathway. It is the emitted light from the laser that produces photochemistry and therefore photobiology. For the basic functions of the body (metabolism), we need food and we have to have oxygen, water and glucose. The glucose or the sugar molecule goes into the cell and gets transported into the mitochondria. Between the inner and outer membrane of the cell, the glucose molecule is transformed through a process called phosphorylation, which is known as Adenosine tri-phosphate which gets converted to the basic energy source of cells called ATP. The last source of the Krebs cycle or the citric acid cycle forms ADP to ATP and involves a Cytochrome which is a light sensitive protein. Our eyes see from 400 to 700 nanometers of light. At four hundred nanometers (400nm), we see violet, then blue, green, orange and yellow. Red is the widest bandwidth, the peak is at 660nm.

Lasers also use two other pathways to help the healing process. One is the nitric oxide pathway. Nitric oxide is a very powerful molecule but it has a very short term life. It causes endothelial cells to relax or become flaccid which causes temporary vasodilation in capillaries. Vasodilation causes more blood, more oxygen and more fuel molecules to the tissues and kicks off the lymphatic system to drain off more interstitial fluids. Some molecules are too big to go through the circulatory system and need to go through the lymphatic system. The nitric oxide causes the lymphatic system to become more leaky and allow more absorption of interstitial fluids. You can take a person with osteoarthritic knees or an inflamed knee and measure the circumference of the knee with a cloth tape measure. After you laser them for 10 to 15 minutes, including the lateral and medial joint lines, you will see a reduction in the measurement of the knee circumference. The lymphatic system is a very important system for the body. It drains fluid, swelling and facilitates the natural fluid flow in order to be healthy. By activating both the cardiovascular system and the lymphatic system you can affect healing at a much faster rate.

The most common reason patients seek our professional help is because of pain. No matter how hard I try to create a practice with patients coming in for diet, nutrition and exercise therapy, I am still known for helping people get out of pain, especially chronic pain. I have a lot of first hand experience using laser to help many people go on their happy way after seeking help and not getting full satisfaction from acupuncture, physical therapy, drug therapy,and surgery. Pain is a biochemical process and laser helps relieve pain.

A nerve cell receives a stimulus of pain, trauma, heat, cold or whatever type. The receptors force sodium outside of the cell wall and create a potential difference of 80 milli-Volt. When the sodium is outside, its very hard for it reintegrate back into the nerve cells. It has to go through a sodium- potassium pump. The peak absorption of lipids is 900 nanometers, so if you look at the lipid membrane of a cell it’s a bi-lipid membrane. By using 905nm light with the “super-pulse” technology we can make the lipid membrane more porous and allow faster integration into nearby channels. This promotes removal of noxious pain chemicals when patients are treated. After a laser treatment the patient will say my injury “feels different,” “my pain is less,” “it dropped from an 8 to a 4 out of 10,” “it feels like I have greater range of motion.” Why? Because we have rebalanced the sodium potassium, we produce a lot of nitric oxide and we took away the inflammation and accelerated the tissue healing by ATP.

I have been impressed with the many conditions that laser can affect: TMJ, traumatic brain injuries, neck pain, shoulder pain, low back pain, knee osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, epicondylitis, iliotibial band, chondromalacia patella, plantar fasciitis, achilles tendinitis and muscle stiffness. There are hundreds if not thousands of conditions to treat but only a few contraindications of laser light.

Because laser light is so powerful, on a square inch basis, it is 100 times more powerful than the sun. This light would be damaging to the eyes. We make sure we wear special glasses and don’t point laser into the eyes. If the light goes into the optical path, the cornea of the lens focuses 30,000 times onto the retina and you would cause permanent damage to the retina if it was a sustained dose. Luckily, we have a blink reflex, but having laser into the eye is one of the main contraindications. If you are working around the periphery of the face, you have to wear glasses. If they are face down on a table and I am working on the back, I ask them to close there eyes, and in this case they don’t need to have laser glasses. Another contraindication is cancer. We do not treat somebody who has cancer if they have not been clear for five years. We are also cautious not to treat the abdomen of a pregnant woman.

Laser is effective for nerve action growth, wound healing, damage to nerves either through surgery or trauma, diabetic ulcers, diabetic polyneuropathy, venous stasis, improving oxygenation and myofascial pain. Laser is noninvasive, has little known side-effects and is safe. In conjunction with exercise therapy, nutrition and our hands-on skills, it is a highly effective treatment. Compared to drugs like NSAIDs and Cox 2 inhibitors, there are no contraindications.

More

Cellulite

The fastest way to look like you’ve toned muscle is to lose some pounds of fat. That’s because the closer you come to removing the lard that covers your butt, abs and thighs, the more defined every muscle becomes, making you look buff all over.

I’ve spent a lot of time helping patients lose that “last 10 pounds of flab”.  Using nutrition and exercise training methods I have shaped the bodies of athletes at all levels.

I help patients slash body fat—some down to single digit percentages. I love to sculpt muscles to help reduce cellulite.

Calculate Your Calories

When it comes to calories, I have a simple rule: I need to know the number of calories you burn a day. I do this with my Total Health System device. Once I know that number I can target your calorie intake. I’ll have you eat for your target body weight. Let’s say you weigh 175 pounds but would like to tip the scales at 150. You’ll adopt the calorie intake of a 150-pound woman or man.

The formula: I’ll teach you which exercises to perform for 1 – 3 hours a week, that’s 15-45 minutes a day depending on your schedule. I’ll even figure out your weight loss target date and suggest how many calories you should consume daily. You can divide those calories into however many meals you want—three, four, five, or six—as long as you don’t eat beyond your daily limit. You will not be hungry!

Eat by the Numbers

Sure, you could just focus on calories. But by eating the right amounts of the right nutrients, you’ll speed your results without feeling like you’re on a diet.

Protein
Protein is the raw material for muscle growth. It also helps extinguish your appetite and aids in fat loss.

The formula:Eat 1 gram for every pound of your target body weight. If you want to weigh 150 pounds, you’ll eat 150 grams of protein. One gram of protein is about 4 calories. So to calculate the calories you’ll be eating from protein, multiply the number of grams by 4. In this case, that’s 600 calories.

Fat
The right dietary fat is good for your skin, brain, cell membranes, nervous system and helps replace bad fat, period. The right kind of fat may actually keep you from overeating because it makes you feel full. The end result: You stop eating sooner and stay satisfied longer.

The formula: Eat half a gram for every pound of your target body weight. If your goal is to weigh 150 pounds, that’d be 75 grams. And since 1 gram of fat has about 9 calories, that’s 675 calories from fat. This will be about 40 percent of your total calories.

Carbohydrates
I know carb-containing foods taste good. The right ones are rich in vitamins and minerals. So you don’t need to eliminate them altogether; you just need to make sure you don’t eat them in excess. I place a greater priority on protein and fat and leave the remainder of your calories for carbs.

The formula: Rather than calculating a formula here, I usually suggest a total of 75-100 grams of carbs for your allotted daily calories. Using the 150-pound example, that leaves you with 300 – 400 calories. This is the amount of calories you can eat from carbs. As protein does, carbs provide about 4 calories per gram. We can divide your carb calories by four to determine how many grams of carbs you can eat.

More

Fish Oil- Definitely YESSS!

I don’t care what you may have heard about taking fish oils in the media, I am definite about there positive health value. I find that the majority of my patients should take fish oil supplements.

Why Take Fish Oils

Three main reasons: 1) it benefits your brain 2)  it benefits your heart 3) it benefits your joints. Omega-3s play a role in protection against Alzheimer’s Disease, depression, and cancer; can help with acne, arthritis, psoriasis and other skin conditions; and can also help with inflammatory bowel disorders. It’s linked with improved brain function. The evidence FOR IT IS JUST TOO GOOD!

If you have a history of heart problems, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, high cholesterol, arthritis, chronic pain, depression, high blood pressure, diabetes, skin problems, or asthma, then you should probably supplement. If you’re concerned because you don’t eat more than two servings of fish a week, you should supplement. If you eat a lot of fish, don’t eat processed foods, and eat pastured animals and eggs, you may not need to supplement.

About Fish Oil Supplements

Like any oil you want it to be fresh and pure.  A good quality is about the type of fish, dosage, freshness, purity, and how natural it is. The best fish oils come from cold water fish. Look for oil that contains at least 60 percent Omega-3.

How Much to Take

The general consensus is that adults who don’t eat a lot of salmon, grass-fed beef, or other foods high in Omega-3 fatty acids and those who eat foods high in Omega 6 fatty acids (nuts, seeds, vegetable oils, and factory-farmed meats) should aim to get between two and four grams of EPA/DHA per day.

Which Fish Oil Should I Take? I recommend fish oil from Metagenics. I also recommendtrying  Krill oil from Xymogen. Take either gel capsuleds or liquid (depending on your desire). I don’t get fish oil burps with these brands! Go to my home page and click on these brand links to order.

More

Improve High Cholesterol With Artichoke Leaf Extract

In an eight-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 92 overweight subjects with mild high blood cholesterol levels, researchers from Italy examined the effects of artichoke leaf extract (250 mg, twice per day) on serum lipid profiles.

After eight weeks of treatment, subjects given artichoke leaf extract showed significant increases in beneficial HDL cholesterol with significant decreases in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol compared to subjects given a placebo. The study authors concluded that “these results indicate that [artichoke leaf extract] could play a relevant role in the management of hypercholesterolaemia, favouring in particular the increase in HDL-C, besides decreasing total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol.”

Rondanelli M, et al. Beneficial effects of artichoke leaf extract supplementation on increasing HDL-cholesterol in subjects with primary mild hypercholesterolaemia: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2013 Feb; 64 (1): 7-15.

More

Depression helped by spice

In a placebo controlled clinical trial that tested curcumin vs. an antidepressant drug, curcumin worked just as well as Prozac. Curcumin matched the drug in alleviating moodiness, anxiety, suicidal thoughts, insomnia, and other depressive symptoms.

Curcumin side effects: Zero.

Prozac side effects: Ever watch a drug commercial on TV!

In addition to the higher risk of dementia for drugs in this category, Prozac’s potential side effects include behavior changes, anxiety, agitation, hostility, hyperactivity, tremors, and insomnia. And — as with most antidepressants — depression may worsen.

A curcumin supplement is the way to go. I also recommend curcumin as a natural anti-inflammatory for my chronic low back pain patients.  In the depression study, 500 mg per day was enough to relieve anxiety, moodiness, and other depressive symptoms.

I recommend Xymogen’s Curcuplex tablets. Click the Xymogen link on the home page to order.

Sources: “Spice Extract Relieves Depression Effectively as Drugs: Study” Kathleen Walter, Nick Tate, Newsmax Health, 10/18/13

More

Plyometrics

Want to run faster, jump higher, move quicker and get in better shape, all at the same time? If you’re answer is yes, it’s time for a lesson in plyometrics. Exercises based on plyometrics repeatedly and rapidly stretch muscles and then contract them, improving muscle power. And don’t we all want a little more muscle power, whether it helps us compete in our favorite sport or just perform our daily physical activities a little easier? Here’s your introduction to plyometrics and a sample routine you can do today.

I recall being in awe watching Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt flash across the finish line at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing and being so impressed with his speed and ability. I continue to be amazed at top basketball players, tennis players, football players, and other athletes as they jump up in the air repeatedly, skillfully maneuver their arms and legs while airborne, land on a small portion of one or both feet, and then move immediately to the next position – all without falling (usually). I shake my head and say to myself, “Now that is power!” One of the best ways to develop this type of power is through plyometric training.

Plyometric training is used to produce fast, powerful movements and improve the function of the nervous system for explosive power. This helps you create muscular movements in the shortest period of time and is especially beneficial to sprinters and athletes who need to accelerate quickly. Plyometric movements train the muscle to load, unload and then reload in rapid sequence, allowing you to jump higher, run faster, throw farther or hit harder, depending on the desired training goal. In short, plyometrics help us improve our speed because we train the body to jump and land with speed.

More

Posture and Body Awareness

Day in and day out, we – and our patients – feel rushed and stressed. Is it any wonder we’ve all distanced ourselves from the body’s signals of discomfort in an effort to get things done? Such messages and signals may manifest as a particular ache or in overall stiffness in the body.

As people sit, stand and walk throughout their day, shouldn’t we provide them with greater consciousness of their poor habits?

Faulty Repeated Movements

One of the first important concepts I try to educate patients on is that repeated movements (especially faulty movements) and prolonged postures result in changes in tissues and movement patterns. This results in a segment developing a susceptibility to move in a specific direction, and this may cause pain because of microtrauma from the stress on the tissues.

For example, consider failure of the stability muscle to hold the lower-limb segments in good posture during the stance phase of running or walking. If the gluteus medius, vastus medialis and tibialis posterior are not functioning optimally, there will be an increase in internal rotation of the femur and valgus positioning of the tibiofemoral joint from heel contact to mid-stance phase. The patella will track laterally, leading to an increase in activity of the tensor fascia latae and vastus lateralis, and the foot will excessively pronate. Such faulty mechanics can be the precursor for Achilles tendinopathy, medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) or iliotibial band syndrome.

Read More… http://www.dynamicchiropractic.ca/mpacms/dc_ca/article.php?id=56202

More