All Posts tagged diet

Lose 5-10 pounds in 2-3 weeks

Shed 5-10 lbs in your first 2-3 weeks.

1. Don’t eat anything that is white. Think about most foods that are white and chances are you shouldn’t be eating it. Specifically, white bread, pasta, sugar, white rice, and most milk products. Healthy foods like cauliflower, chicken, turkey, fish are all exceptions to this rule.

2. Only drink water, NOTHING else! How about coffee? One to two cups of organic black coffee is ok. Can you add half and half?…Well is it white?

3. Avoid, restrict, eliminate wheat! What if it’s whole wheat? Duh!!!

I highly recommend you do the above with UltraMeal medical food. Take 2 scoops and add it to water. The flavors are delicious and this product is what I use with all of my clients that want weight loss.   Order @ www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

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Arthritis…back pain…headaches…stomach problems… Whatever the cause, you just want the pain to go away – FAST.

Your medical doctor can prescribe the latest pain relievers (with side effects!).  But many of my patients are getting better long-term results by eating the right FOODS and taking the right SUPPLEMENTS and learning proper EXERCISES. The nutritional and exercise work I am doing with patients is exciting and involves educating patients to the proper diet and which supplements to take. Keep reading through the website and you will see many articles and posts that can help you decide if this approach is right for you. Call me at 310-473-2911 for specific questions regarding your individual case.

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Good Organic Food Choices

Meal Replacement Shakes: UltraMeal Plus 360 (order @ www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com)

2 scoops with water or juice

190 calories

15 grams (g) protein

24 g carbs

3 g fat

 

Eggs: Eggland’s Best Organic
Scrambled, fried, or poached, these heart-healthier eggs cook up flavorful and fluffy.
One large egg:
70 calories
6 grams (g) protein
0 g carbs
4 g fat

 

Cereal: Kashi Whole Wheat Biscuits, Cinnamon Harvest
One serving is nearly 20 percent of your daily fiber, and it doesn’t taste like the box it came in.
2 oz:
180 calories
6 g protein
43 g carbs (5 g fiber)
1 g fat

Milk: Stonyfield Organic Reduced Fat
1 cup:
130 calories
8 g protein
13 g carbs
5 g fat

Lunch Meat: Applegate Farms Organic Roasted Turkey Breast
2 oz:
50 calories
10 g protein
1 g carbs
0 g fat

Deli Cheese: Applegate Farms Organic Mild Cheddar Cheese
1 slice:
85 calories
5 g protein
0 g carbs
6 g fat

Condiment: Annie’s Naturals Organic Dijon Mustard
No calories, tons of flavor  

Postworkout Recovery Drink: Organic Valley Reduced Fat Chocolate Milk
Good  protein for your muscles.
Per cup:
170 calories
8 g protein
24 g carbs
5 g fat

Meat: Full Circle Bison Ranch Organic Gras Fed Buffalo (Rib Eye)
3 oz:
150 calories
25 g protein
0 g carbs
5 g fat

Yogurt: Stoneyfield Oikos Organic Greek Yogurt with Honey
Sweetened naturally (and organically) without added preservatives.
5.3 oz container:
120 calories
13 g protein
18 g carbs

Breakfast shakes: UltraMeal Whey medical food (2 scoops with water or juice)

150 calories

15 g protein

24 g carbs

1 g fat

order UltraMeal @ www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

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New understandings about adult protein needs

This article substaniates why I recommend OptiCleanse GHI from Xymogen & UltraMeal from Metagenics as important protein shakes

Donald K Layman  Department of Food Science & Human Nutrition, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA

Nutrition & Metabolism 2009, 6:12doi:10.1186/1743-7075-6-12

The developing controversy about Dietary Guidelines for protein stems from current perceptions that protein intakes above minimum requirements have no benefit and may pose long-term health risks. These beliefs are largely based on assumptions and extrapolations with little foundation in nutrition science. Diets with increased protein have now been shown to improve adult health with benefits for treatment or prevention of obesity, osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, heart disease, and sarcopenia [14]. 

During the past decade a growing body of research reveals that dietary protein intakes above the RDA are beneficial in maintaining muscle function and mobility [6] and in the treatment of diseases including obesity, osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes (T2DM), Metabolic Syndrome (MetS), heart disease, and sarcopenia [14]. The new research establishes health benefits and provides molecular evidence of numerous metabolic outcomes associated with protein intake or amino acid metabolism that are not reflected in the traditional measure of nitrogen balance. These outcomes include cell signaling via leucine [7,8], satiety [9,10], thermogenesis [11], and glycemic control [12,13]. The dietary protein necessary to optimize each of these metabolic outcomes is not reflected in measures of nitrogen balance and is not represented within the current concept of the minimum RDA. So what is known and what is missing in current Dietary Guidelines?

The efficiency of protein utilization decreases throughout adult life [6]. During aging, there is an increase in the requirement for EAA to produce a positive response in muscle protein synthesis [16,17]. The need for total protein may not change, but the effectiveness of amino acids to stimulate muscle (and probably bone) protein metabolism decreases requiring either more total protein or greater nutrient density of EAA/total protein (i.e. protein quality). The change in efficiency of EAA use appears to be associated with the loss of anabolic drive for development of lean tissue [18]. During growth, the body has a high metabolic priority for structural development of muscle and bone driven by anabolic hormones including insulin, growth hormone, IGF-1 and steroid hormones. Further, physical activity has a positive effect on the efficiency of use of amino acids [19]. Muscle protein synthesis is stimulated by stretching and resistance activity. The converse is also true; a sedentary lifestyle reduces the efficiency of EAA use. After approximately age 30 y, the anabolic drive is lost; basal levels of hormones become largely ineffective in stimulating protein synthesis in structural tissues; and diet quality and physical activity become the limiting factors for maintaining optimal protein turnover for repair, remodeling, and recovery.

In summary, omissions in current understanding of dietary protein needs are that 1) nitrogen balance and amino acid oxidation are only useful for defining minimum protein requirements and not optimum amino acid needs, 2) protein requirement is proportional to body weight and inversely proportional to energy intake, and 3) adults need more EAA than children to maintain the efficiency of protein turnover in structural tissues.

New knowledge about protein

Protein and amino acids contribute to multiple metabolic roles …Dietary protein influences cell signaling, satiety, thermogenesis and glycemic regulations and each of these roles is initiated by increases in plasma and intracellular amino acid concentrations. 

Most adults consume less than 10 g of protein at breakfast [23,24] (Figure 1). In children and young adults, uneven meal distribution of protein appears not to adversely affect growth. The anabolic drive maintains high efficiency of protein use for nitrogen retention even when daily protein is consumed as a single large meal. However in older adults, the quantity and quality of protein at individual meals is important. Adults require a minimum of 15 g of EAA or at least 30 g of total protein to fully stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis [21,25]. This response appears to be determined by the EAA leucine which serves as a critical signal for triggering initiation of muscle protein synthesis. Leucine has been well characterized as a unique regulator of the insulin-mTOR signal pathway controlling synthesis of muscle proteins [7,8]. In children and young adults, this signal pathway is regulated by insulin and dietary energy while leucine regulates the pathway in adults [26]. Current dietary patterns that provide adequate protein or leucine at only one meal produce an anabolic response only after that meal (Figure 1). This is a critical factor for protection of lean tissues during weight loss or to prevent age-related sarcopenia and osteoporosis.

Figure 1. Protein distribution at meals. A) Ingestion of 90 grams of protein, distributed evenly at 3 meals. B) Ingestion of 90 grams of proteins unevenly distributed throughout the day. Stimulating muscle protein synthesis to a maximal extent during the meals shown in Figure 1A is more likely to provide a greater 24 hour protein anabolic response than the unequal protein distribution in Figure 1B. (Adapted from Paddon-Jones & Rassmussen Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 2009, 12: 86–90.)

The meal content of protein is also a key factor for satiety and appetite regulation [9,10]. Protein has greater satiety value than either carbohydrates or fats and reduces food intake at subsequent meals [27]. Studies of energy regulation for weight management show that replacing carbohydrates with protein reduces daily energy intake by ~200 kcal [9]. The mechanism for this satiety effect may be mediated by intestinal hormones or by reducing peak post-prandial insulin response. While the mechanism remains to be elucidated, it is clear that the improved satiety response requires >30 g of protein at a meal and that breakfast has the greatest impact on total daily energy intake [27]. As with protein turnover in muscle and bone, limiting protein intake to a single large meal late in the day reduces the satiety benefits of dietary protein [22].

The most unequivocal evidence for the benefit of increased dietary protein is derived from studies of weight management [1,28,29]. Diets with increased protein have been shown to be highly beneficial during weight loss because of their ability to correct body composition and increase satiety and thermogenesis. Higher protein diets increase loss of body weight and body fat and attenuate loss of lean tissue when compared with commonly recommended high carbohydrate low fat low protein diets [28,30]. Clearly, the major factors accounting for weight loss are the magnitude of energy restriction and individual compliance. Any diet can produce weight loss. However, long-term success with weight loss relates to maintenance of metabolically active lean tissues and research has proven that higher protein diets protect muscle and bone during weight loss. Use of conventional high carbohydrate, low fat, low protein diets results in 30% to 40% loss of lean tissue mass. Use of higher protein diets reduces lean tissue loss to <15% and when combined with exercise can halt loss of lean tissue during weight loss [3032]. Studies also show that moderate protein diets have better long-term compliance.

The effects of protein for maintaining lean tissues appear to translate into health benefits during aging where progressive loss of structural strength and mobility are critical factors. Osteoporosis and sarcopenia have emerged as major issues during aging [2,3]. Prevention of osteoporosis is associated with physical activity and dietary calcium and protein [3]. The efficacy of calcium and protein are interrelated [3]. Calcium supplements are largely ineffective for remodeling of bone matrix if protein is limiting. Positive effects of calcium appear to require intakes of protein >1.2 g/kg to have beneficial effects. The long-held belief that increased dietary protein could cause bone loss as reflected in increase urinary calcium is incorrect [33] and protein is now recognized to increase intestinal calcium absorption in addition to enhancing bone matrix turnover [34].

Similar results have been observed with studies of muscle health in elderly where the efficiency of EAA use is reduced [16,17]. The level of EAA required to stimulate muscle protein synthesis is increased in part due to reduced anabolic stimulus of hormones.

Early research with MetS evaluated reducing dietary carbohydrates with fats [36]. While increasing dietary fats improved glycemic control and reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, the prospect of increasing dietary fat remains controversial. Replacement of carbohydrates with protein improves glycemic control measured as reduced post-prandial hyperinsulinemia [37] and in T2DM corrects hyperglycemia and HbA1c [13]. Equally important, reduced carbohydrate diets have decreased TAG, increased HDL and increased LDL particle size (i.e. LDL-C/ApoB) improving the dyslipidemia commonly associated with T2DM and MetS [4]. These conditions are 4-times more important for heart disease and all cause mortality than elevated cholesterol or LDL concentration [38].

New understandings about protein for the Dietary Guidelines

• Protein is a critical part of the adult diet

Protein should be a central part of a complete diet for adults. While physical growth occurs only for a brief period of life, the need to repair and remodel muscle and bone continues throughout life. Protein needs become more important during periods of reduced food intake such as weight loss or during periods of recovery after illness or during aging.

• Protein needs are proportional to body weight; NOT energy intake

Protein needs for adults relate to body weight. The acceptable protein range is 10% to 35% of total energy. However, protein needs are constant across all energy intakes. So at low energy intakes, protein needs to be a higher percentage of total calories and at high energy intakes protein can be reduced as a percentage of total calories. In general, dietary protein should be established first in any diet in proportion to body weight and then carbohydrates and fats added determined by energy needs.

• Optimal adult protein use is a function of intake at individual meals

Protein is an important part of good nutrition at every meal. Vitamins and minerals can fulfill nutrient needs on a once-per-day basis but for protein the body has no ability to store a daily supply. To maintain healthy muscles and bones for adults, at least 30 g of protein should be consumed at more than one meal. Breakfast is an important meal for dietary protein because the body is in a catabolic state after an overnight fast. A meal with at least 30 g of protein is required to initiate repletion of body proteins. Protein at breakfast is also critical for regulation of appetite and daily food intake.

• Most adults benefit from protein intakes above the minimum RDA

Aging populations confront increasing incidence of obesity, osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, heart disease, and sarcopenia which have raised new questions about dietary ratios of carbohydrates, fats, and protein for life-long health. The RDA represents the minimum daily intake for active healthy adults. For most adults, replacing some dietary carbohydrates with protein will help to maintain body composition and mobility, improve blood lipids and lipoproteins, and help to control food intake.

References

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  2. Paddon-Jones D, Short KR, Campbell WW, Volpi E, Wolfe RR: Role of dietary protein in the sarcopenia of aging. Am J Clin Nutr 2008 , 87:1562S-1566S. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text

    aney RP, Layman DK: Amount and type of protein influences bone health.

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  4. Layman DK, Clifton P, Gannon MC, Krauss RM, Nuttall FQ: Protein in optimal health: heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

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  • Westerterp-Plantenga MS, Rolland V, Wilson SAJ, Westerterp KR: Satiety related to 24-h diet-induced thermogenesis during high protein/carbohydrate vs high fat diets measured in a respiratory chamber. Eur J Clin Nutr 1999 , 53:495-502. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Layman DK, Baum JI: Dietary protein impact on glycemic control during weight loss.
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  • Gannon MC, Nuttall FQ, Saeed A, Jordan K, Hoover H: An increase in dietary protein improves the blood glucose response in persons with type 2 diabetes. Am J Clin Nutr 2003 , 78:734-41. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board: Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein and Amino Acids. Washington DC: National Academy Press; 2002.
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  • Volpi E, Sheffield-Moore M, Rasmussen BB, Wolfe RR: Basal muscle amino acid kinetics and protein synthesis in healthy young and older men. JAMA 2001 , 286:1206-1212. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Volpi E, Mittendorfer B, Rasmussen BB, Wolfe RR: The response of muscle protein anabolism to combined hyperaminoacidemia and glucose-induced hyperinsulinemia is impaired in the elderly.
  • J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2000 , 85:4481-4490. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Millward DJ, Rivers JPW: The need for indispensable amino acids: the concept of the anabolic drive. Diabetes Metab Rev 1989 , 5(2):191-212. PubMed Abstract OpenURL

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  • Fujita S, Rasmussen BB, Cadenas JG, Drummond MJ, Glynn EL, Sattler FR, Volpi E: Aerobic exercise overcomes the age-related insulin resistance of muscle protein metabolism by improving endothelial function and Akt/mTOR signaling.
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  • Paddon-Jones D, Rasmussen BB: Dietary protein recommendations and the prevention of sarcopenia.
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  • de Castro JM: The time of day of food intake influences overall intake in humans. J Nutr 2004 , 134:104-111. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • USDA/NHANES [http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place/12355000/pdf/Table_9_BIA.pdf] webcite
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  • Garlick PJ: The role of leucine in the regulation of protein metabolism. J Nutr 2005 , 135:1553S-1556S. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Rolls BJ, Hetherington M, Burley VJ: The specificity of satiety: The influence of foods of different macronutrient content on the development of satiety.
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  • Krieger JW, Sitren HS, Daniels MJ, Langkamp-Henken B: Effects of variation in protein and carbohydrate intake on body mass and composition during energy restriction: a meta-regression. Am J Clin Nutr 2006 , 83:260-274. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Layman DK, Walker DA: Protein importance of leucine in treatment of obesity and the metabolic syndrome.
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  • Layman DK, Evans EM, Erickson D, Seyler J, Weber J, Bagshaw D, Griel A, Psota T, Kris-Etherton P: A moderate-protein diet produces sustained weight loss and long-term changes in body composition and blood lipids in obese adults. J Nutr 2009 , 139:514-21. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Layman DK, Boileau RA, Erickson DJ, Painter JE, Shiue H, Sather C, Christou DD: A reduced ratio of dietary carbohydrate to protein improves body composition and blood lipid profiles during weight loss in adult women.
  • J Nutr 2003 , 133:411-417. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Layman DK, Evans E, Baum JI, Seyler J, Erickson DJ, Boileau RA: Dietary protein and exercise have additive effects on body composition during weight loss in adult women. J Nutr 2005 , 135:1903-1910. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Margen S, Chu J, Kaufmann N, Calloway D: Studies in calcium metabolism. 1. The calciuretic effect of dietary protein.
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  • Kerstetter J, O’Brien K, Insogna K: Dietary protein affects intestinal calcium absorption. Am J Clin Nutr 1998 , 68:859-65. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Houston DK, Nicklas BJ, Ding J, Harris TB, Tylavsky FA, Newman AB, Lee JS, Sahyoun NR, Visser M, Kritchevsky SB: Dietary protein intake is associated with lean mass change in older, community-dwelling adults: the Health, Aging, and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study.
  • Am J Clin Nutr 2008 , 87:150-155. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Reaven GM: The metabolic syndrome: is this diagnosis necessary? Am J Clin Nutr 2006 , 83:1237-47. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Walker-Lasker DA, Evans EM, Layman DK: Moderate carbohydrate, moderate protein weight loss diet reduces cardiovascular disease risk compared to high carbohydrate, low protein diet in obese adults: A randomized clinical trial.
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  • Isomaa B, Almgren P, Tuomi T, Forsen B, Lahti K, Nissen M, Taskinen MR, Groop L: Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with the metabolic syndrome. Diabetes Care 2001 , 24:683-689. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text  
  • The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/6/1/12
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    Weight Loss Tips

    1. Find an “accountability” partner. It helps if that person is supportive, positive, and will encourage you in your weight loss efforts. Often times you will want to look outside of your family members and best friends for support. Tell your accountability partner what you’re doing, what your goals are and how they can best support you. Talk to them on a regular basis and anytime you are struggling and need support.

    2. Be as intentional as you can by telling people what you are doing. Don’t be afraid to tell people about your intention.

    3. Begin working out even if it is only 10-15 minutes per day. If you are already working out regularly, it’s time to step up the intensity again! In the morning, do a 4 minute circuit of squats and lunges. Add a 4 minute circuit of some push ups, bridges and abs. Then add another 2 minutes of running in place or jumping jacks. In the evening do the same thing. So that’s 10 minutes of work in the morning and 10 minutes in the evening for a total of 20 minutes of workout time. Keep the exercises simple – don’t feel like you have to be at the gym to workout. Do it at home or at work.

    4. Go shopping. This is an important part of the process. Find an outfit that you really, really want, and find it in the size that you want to be. Buy it in the size that you will be wearing when you lose all the weight you want to lose (not just the 10 pounds). So if you want to lose 25 pounds total, buy it in the size you’ll be wearing after your 25 pound weight loss. Make sense?

    When you get the outfit, I want you to hang it up somewhere you can see it every day, like on your bathroom door or closet door. If you can’t buy the outfit today, find a picture of it in a magazine or on the internet, cut it out and post it somewhere where you will see it everyday, like your bathroom mirror or refrigerator.

    5. Make one simple nutrition change this week. Make sure it is simple and easy to do. Cut out bread, a muffin or a bagel! Drinking 2 sodas a day? Cut down to 1. Skipping breakfast every day? Pledge to make a protein shake for breakfast 3 times per week. Add a glass of water or an extra vegetable serving to your diet.

    Now what I want you to do is to leave a comment and tell me what outfit you’re going to buy and what nutrition change you’re making. I can’t wait to hear what you come up with!

    If you have read this far I know you are serious. I love that you have a goal, but I need you to dig way deeper. If fitting into your outfit was so important, you would have done it by now, right? Guys, you need this too. Most of you have a belly to lose. Are you feeling good enough to go shirtless? I need you to ask yourself “Why? is it important for you to lose weight (or go shirtless) and look amazing in that outfit. Take out a piece of paper or your journal and a pen and keep asking yourself the question Why? Your first response may be simple, “I want to look good for my significant other”. “Why” is this important? Keep asking yourself “why” over and over again until you come up with a reason that is really emotional for you, one that will keep you going when you want to give up.

    Sit down with a blank piece of paper or a journal and a pen. Go to a room where you won’t be disturbed. Now imagine yourself wearing your favorite outfit that you picked out. Imagine how you feel wearing that outfit or going shirtless. Who do you see? What compliments do you get? If you’re wearing a little black dress, maybe you’re at a party. If you’re in your swimsuit, you might be on a beautiful beach. What are you wearing? A fitted shirt to show off your new lean physique? Who is looking at you and noticing you. Write down exactly what it is like to wear your outfit, who you’re with, how you feel and what you are doing. Be as specific as possible and write it down in the present tense, as if it is happening now – not the future tense. Take about 10 minutes for this.

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    Maintaining Physical and Cognitive Vitality: Research-based lifestyle recommendations

    – lifelong learning and intellectual stimulation
    – regular exercise
    – ongoing social activities
    – stress reduction practices
    – sound sleep with vivid dreaming
    – emotional fluidity and expression
    – regular sexual activity
    – optimal nutrition with appropriate caloric intake
    – appropriate dietary supplementation

    My favorite things to do with clients is teaching them corrective exercises and developing diet & nutrition plans.

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    Did You Know That I Perform Body Fat Analysis?

    A critical question I often get is: how much should I weight? What should my body fat be? The appropriate weight for each individual may vary. What’s the best way to achieve fat loss?
    I tackle these questions everyday in the office. I draw on my 27 years experience at helping people lose weight and on new sports scientific findings into optimal weight loss techniques for both men and women. I look at the relationship between body fat, exercise, stress, diet, supplements and performance. I help clients identify complicating factors to weight loss and performance enhancement, because it is not enough just to say that the more you workout, the thinner you get, the better you feel. If only it were that easy…
    I love to see body fat content decrease when I work with clients. The test I perform to measure body fat is called BIA (Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis). I have a machine that tells us how much body fat you have and how much lean muscle mass you have. It also tells me the number of calories you burn a day, as well as your water content amounts. Fat stores account for about 15-18% of total body weight in normal young men, and in young women the figure is about 25-30%.
    Our fat stores are important and the fat cells play many key roles. As well as acting as a reserve of energy that can be called upon at times of need, fat is important in the structure of tissues, in hormone metabolism, and in providing a cushion that protects other tissues. Moreover, there’s good evidence that the immune system is impaired when body fat stores are too low. A reduced ability to fight infections means more interruptions to training and more chance of being sick on race day.
    Let me help you identify strategies you can safely use to control weight and body fat, come into the office for your easy to perform body composition analysis.

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