All Posts tagged diabetes

SLEEP: Insulin levels & sleep

You might be doing everything right to avoid insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes – keeping your weight down, exercising, and following a balanced diet, free of added sugars, junk foods, and simple carbs.

But if you’re not getting enough sleep, it may not be doing you a bit of good.

In a recent study, researchers from Leiden University in the Netherlands checked the insulin levels of nine healthy people after eight hours of sleep. In the second phase of the study, the same subjects slept four hours and their insulin levels were checked again. Results showed that just this ONE night of inadequate sleep reduced insulin sensitivity by as much as 25 percent in some subjects.

In the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, the authors note that insulin sensitivity is apparently not fixed. Even in healthy people, a single night of poor sleep can temporarily knock everything out of whack. 

Of course, one night of late-to-bed, early-to-rise won’t prompt type 2 diabetes. But it very well could if that turns into a regular sleep pattern. Last year, a study showed that people who get an average of less then six hours of sleep each night are more than four times more likely to develop blood sugar dysfunction compared to those who average more than six hours per night. 

Researchers at the University of Warwick reviewed 16 sleep studies from various countries, including the U.S., Europe, and East Asia. Two results emerged: 1) Habitual lack of sleep increases risk of premature death by more than 10 percent, and 2) Excessive sleep (an average of more than nine hours each night) is also linked with premature death.

The difference: Too little sleep causes poor health, while too much sleep indicates that a serious health issue (such as hypertension) is already underway. 

For some people, the fix for too little sleep is simple: Take this warning seriously and force yourself to turn off the TV, say “good night” to everyone a little earlier, and get adequate rest every night.

For others, insomnia is a monster that’s hard to tame. 

There are a number of natural sleep-aids that can help ease you into slumber without worrying about waking up with a brain fog hangover from prescription drugs. 

I  recommend five natural sleep-inducers: L-tryptophan, melatonin, valerian root, L-theanine and kava. A very helpful supplement for support for restful sleep & relaxation is Somnolin by Metagenics. Order @ www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com 

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True or False About Diabetes?

  • Prediabetes is a common condition you can live with “normally” as long as you keep your glucose levels under control with medications.
  • Type 2 diabetes is irreversible.
  • Having diabetes is no big deal these days. By monitoring your blood sugar and following your doctor’s orders, you can enjoy a normal life and escape diabetic complications, including nerve damage, going blind and losing limbs through amputation — not to mention heart attack, stroke and Alzheimer’s disease.

The answers are false!

Look up UltraGlycemX & Insinase at www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

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Lasting Weight Loss

Let talk about Fat:

My mother in law has cooked with olive oil her whole life. She was a very heavy lady until she had gastric bypass surgery. But she doesn’t have heart disease.  Her kids are healthy& robust. Her family appears to enjoy good health. My mom always cooked with butter instead of margarine. When the fad went to vegetable oils and hydrogenated fats, we tossed out natural saturated fats and embraced trans fats. This was a big, big  mistake.

Fat is an important part of diet. The simple truth about fat is: you have to eat fat to lose fat. I just need you to eat the right kind of fat.

Fat fell out of favor at the end of the 70’s. Once the 80’s hit, the government told us that animal fats caused heart disease. The Government Guidelines recommended we limit our saturated fat to less than 10 percent of our daily calories. Americans started buying low-fat products. However, over the next two decades, we have seen an epidemic of obesity and diabetes.

Now in 2010 the latest science is supporting saturated fats again. In the March edition of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition researchers attribute America’s obesity and bad health to carbs – not saturated fats. I believe cardiovascular disease or coronary heart disease is linked to too much carbs in the diet. Reducing saturated fat in the diet does not prolong life or lower the incidence of coronary heart disease. 

The real killer is trans-fatty acids, not saturated fat. Trans fat should be omitted from our diet, period.

I don’t care if my patients get about 50 percent of their fat intake from saturated fat. I want to see  “good” cholesterol (HDL) levels, and no problems with insulin resistance. High HDL is the most reliable way to prevent heart disease.

I recommend eating a diet with good-quality protein and good-quality fat.

Most of the nutritionist I talk to, recommend fats and oils for good health. Why?

Fats including the Omega-3 fatty acids (EPA-DHA 720) – a deficiency can lead to depression, dementia, lack of concentration and a host of chronic diseases including heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

Eat the right fats and you will:

  • Burn fat
  • Increase weight loss
  • Increase your metabolism
  • Reduce inflammation
  • Become more sensitive to insulin, which will balance your blood sugar

I recommend EPA-DHA 720 by Metagenics as a good source of omega 3 fatty acids

www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

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“Glucorest”

 Essentially converts a high Glycemic load meal into a Low Glycemic load

Perfect for Pre Diabetic / Diabetic patients that are working on their diet

Similar efficacy / no side effects to leading prescription drugs (Precose – Acarbose)

Improves Fasting Blood Glucose*

Lowers glycated Hemoglobin levels*

Decreases Triglycerides*

*(in research with Diabetic patients)

Tablet form / 1 tablet before meal

If you are interested in purchasing,  please order from www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com.

 

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Diabetes neuropathy – numbness & tingling in leg

I have diabetes and get pins and needles and burning sensation in my legs. I’m on metformin and glyburide. Is there anything nutritionally you recommend?
 
The nerve sensation you describe is called neuropathy. Diabetes, shingles, Celiac, heavy metal toxicity, nutrient deficiencies, autoimmune disorders and neurological conditions are caues of these sensations.
 
Other neuropathy symptoms include burning, weakness, muscle pain & weakness,  shooting pain, tingling, numbness, feeling like you got stabbed by an ice pick, cystitis, urinary urgency, vibration/buzzing sensations, erectile dysfunction, loss of bladder control, poor coordination,   trigeminal neuralgia, and dizziness when standing up.   
The number one thing you can do to reduce pain is to lower your blood sugar. That is why I  recommend the Paleo diet or a Mediterranean diet. Both food plans minimise carb’s. I try to keep clients at 100-150 grams of carb’s daily. 
 
Here is a list of some of the common supplements that I recommend.
 Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) – This is one of the most important antioxidants. It helps defend you against free radicals that attack your myelin sheath and ‘fray’ your nerve wiring. Be diligent in taking it every day for several weeks before you make up your mind about ALA. Try 200 – 250 two to four times daily.
 
Take ALA with omega 3 fish oil (EPA-DHA 720’s). I like to see patients take at least 3-4 grams of EPA-DHA 720’s daily. Order @ www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com
 
GlycemX 360 is a medical food powder that you can make into a delicious shake. It  contains natural things that reduce blood sugar, chase away a pain-causing chemical TNF as well as nitric oxide. Other ingredients include Methylcobalamin (B12) -when your body starves for B12, you lose the myelin sheath and your nerves short circuit. This can cause neuropathy and depression.  There are dozens of drug muggers of B12, including the diabetic medications that you take as well as processed foods, sugar, antibiotics, estrogen hormones and acid blockers. 
 
Thiamine – I’d suggest about 100 mg daily for a few months, along with a low dose B-complex so you have all the other Bs on board. 

Neuragen- It’s a topical ointment sold at pharmacies and online. A study showed that it might be  helpful for shingles neuralgia, diabetic or HIV neuropathy or trigeminal neuralgia.
All of these recommendations help get more oxygen to your cells, reduce inflammation, protect the myelin wrapper around your delicate nerves, quench toxic free radicals and reduce protein kinase C (PKC). www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com
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GlycemX™ 360? Medical Food NEW MEDICAL FOOD for TYPE 2 DIABETES

  • Provides specialized nutritional support for patients with type 2 diabetes, including:
    • Selective kinase response modulators (SKRMs) in the form of RIAA and acacia, which have been shown to beneficially influence insulin and triglyceride levels
    • Proprietary soy protein (15 grams) and plant sterols (2 grams, including beta-sitosterol) to support healthy heart function
    • Cinnamon, which has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity
    • Chromium, biotin, and magnesium to promote healthy glucose metabolism and insulin function
    • Foundation macro- and micronutrients to support overall health, plus inositol
  • Available in delicious Vanilla and Chocolate flavors
  • Features a lower cost 
  • Price $59.95
  • Order www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com
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    New understandings about adult protein needs

    This article substaniates why I recommend OptiCleanse GHI from Xymogen & UltraMeal from Metagenics as important protein shakes

    Donald K Layman  Department of Food Science & Human Nutrition, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA

    Nutrition & Metabolism 2009, 6:12doi:10.1186/1743-7075-6-12

    The developing controversy about Dietary Guidelines for protein stems from current perceptions that protein intakes above minimum requirements have no benefit and may pose long-term health risks. These beliefs are largely based on assumptions and extrapolations with little foundation in nutrition science. Diets with increased protein have now been shown to improve adult health with benefits for treatment or prevention of obesity, osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, heart disease, and sarcopenia [14]. 

    During the past decade a growing body of research reveals that dietary protein intakes above the RDA are beneficial in maintaining muscle function and mobility [6] and in the treatment of diseases including obesity, osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes (T2DM), Metabolic Syndrome (MetS), heart disease, and sarcopenia [14]. The new research establishes health benefits and provides molecular evidence of numerous metabolic outcomes associated with protein intake or amino acid metabolism that are not reflected in the traditional measure of nitrogen balance. These outcomes include cell signaling via leucine [7,8], satiety [9,10], thermogenesis [11], and glycemic control [12,13]. The dietary protein necessary to optimize each of these metabolic outcomes is not reflected in measures of nitrogen balance and is not represented within the current concept of the minimum RDA. So what is known and what is missing in current Dietary Guidelines?

    The efficiency of protein utilization decreases throughout adult life [6]. During aging, there is an increase in the requirement for EAA to produce a positive response in muscle protein synthesis [16,17]. The need for total protein may not change, but the effectiveness of amino acids to stimulate muscle (and probably bone) protein metabolism decreases requiring either more total protein or greater nutrient density of EAA/total protein (i.e. protein quality). The change in efficiency of EAA use appears to be associated with the loss of anabolic drive for development of lean tissue [18]. During growth, the body has a high metabolic priority for structural development of muscle and bone driven by anabolic hormones including insulin, growth hormone, IGF-1 and steroid hormones. Further, physical activity has a positive effect on the efficiency of use of amino acids [19]. Muscle protein synthesis is stimulated by stretching and resistance activity. The converse is also true; a sedentary lifestyle reduces the efficiency of EAA use. After approximately age 30 y, the anabolic drive is lost; basal levels of hormones become largely ineffective in stimulating protein synthesis in structural tissues; and diet quality and physical activity become the limiting factors for maintaining optimal protein turnover for repair, remodeling, and recovery.

    In summary, omissions in current understanding of dietary protein needs are that 1) nitrogen balance and amino acid oxidation are only useful for defining minimum protein requirements and not optimum amino acid needs, 2) protein requirement is proportional to body weight and inversely proportional to energy intake, and 3) adults need more EAA than children to maintain the efficiency of protein turnover in structural tissues.

    New knowledge about protein

    Protein and amino acids contribute to multiple metabolic roles …Dietary protein influences cell signaling, satiety, thermogenesis and glycemic regulations and each of these roles is initiated by increases in plasma and intracellular amino acid concentrations. 

    Most adults consume less than 10 g of protein at breakfast [23,24] (Figure 1). In children and young adults, uneven meal distribution of protein appears not to adversely affect growth. The anabolic drive maintains high efficiency of protein use for nitrogen retention even when daily protein is consumed as a single large meal. However in older adults, the quantity and quality of protein at individual meals is important. Adults require a minimum of 15 g of EAA or at least 30 g of total protein to fully stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis [21,25]. This response appears to be determined by the EAA leucine which serves as a critical signal for triggering initiation of muscle protein synthesis. Leucine has been well characterized as a unique regulator of the insulin-mTOR signal pathway controlling synthesis of muscle proteins [7,8]. In children and young adults, this signal pathway is regulated by insulin and dietary energy while leucine regulates the pathway in adults [26]. Current dietary patterns that provide adequate protein or leucine at only one meal produce an anabolic response only after that meal (Figure 1). This is a critical factor for protection of lean tissues during weight loss or to prevent age-related sarcopenia and osteoporosis.

    Figure 1. Protein distribution at meals. A) Ingestion of 90 grams of protein, distributed evenly at 3 meals. B) Ingestion of 90 grams of proteins unevenly distributed throughout the day. Stimulating muscle protein synthesis to a maximal extent during the meals shown in Figure 1A is more likely to provide a greater 24 hour protein anabolic response than the unequal protein distribution in Figure 1B. (Adapted from Paddon-Jones & Rassmussen Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 2009, 12: 86–90.)

    The meal content of protein is also a key factor for satiety and appetite regulation [9,10]. Protein has greater satiety value than either carbohydrates or fats and reduces food intake at subsequent meals [27]. Studies of energy regulation for weight management show that replacing carbohydrates with protein reduces daily energy intake by ~200 kcal [9]. The mechanism for this satiety effect may be mediated by intestinal hormones or by reducing peak post-prandial insulin response. While the mechanism remains to be elucidated, it is clear that the improved satiety response requires >30 g of protein at a meal and that breakfast has the greatest impact on total daily energy intake [27]. As with protein turnover in muscle and bone, limiting protein intake to a single large meal late in the day reduces the satiety benefits of dietary protein [22].

    The most unequivocal evidence for the benefit of increased dietary protein is derived from studies of weight management [1,28,29]. Diets with increased protein have been shown to be highly beneficial during weight loss because of their ability to correct body composition and increase satiety and thermogenesis. Higher protein diets increase loss of body weight and body fat and attenuate loss of lean tissue when compared with commonly recommended high carbohydrate low fat low protein diets [28,30]. Clearly, the major factors accounting for weight loss are the magnitude of energy restriction and individual compliance. Any diet can produce weight loss. However, long-term success with weight loss relates to maintenance of metabolically active lean tissues and research has proven that higher protein diets protect muscle and bone during weight loss. Use of conventional high carbohydrate, low fat, low protein diets results in 30% to 40% loss of lean tissue mass. Use of higher protein diets reduces lean tissue loss to <15% and when combined with exercise can halt loss of lean tissue during weight loss [3032]. Studies also show that moderate protein diets have better long-term compliance.

    The effects of protein for maintaining lean tissues appear to translate into health benefits during aging where progressive loss of structural strength and mobility are critical factors. Osteoporosis and sarcopenia have emerged as major issues during aging [2,3]. Prevention of osteoporosis is associated with physical activity and dietary calcium and protein [3]. The efficacy of calcium and protein are interrelated [3]. Calcium supplements are largely ineffective for remodeling of bone matrix if protein is limiting. Positive effects of calcium appear to require intakes of protein >1.2 g/kg to have beneficial effects. The long-held belief that increased dietary protein could cause bone loss as reflected in increase urinary calcium is incorrect [33] and protein is now recognized to increase intestinal calcium absorption in addition to enhancing bone matrix turnover [34].

    Similar results have been observed with studies of muscle health in elderly where the efficiency of EAA use is reduced [16,17]. The level of EAA required to stimulate muscle protein synthesis is increased in part due to reduced anabolic stimulus of hormones.

    Early research with MetS evaluated reducing dietary carbohydrates with fats [36]. While increasing dietary fats improved glycemic control and reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, the prospect of increasing dietary fat remains controversial. Replacement of carbohydrates with protein improves glycemic control measured as reduced post-prandial hyperinsulinemia [37] and in T2DM corrects hyperglycemia and HbA1c [13]. Equally important, reduced carbohydrate diets have decreased TAG, increased HDL and increased LDL particle size (i.e. LDL-C/ApoB) improving the dyslipidemia commonly associated with T2DM and MetS [4]. These conditions are 4-times more important for heart disease and all cause mortality than elevated cholesterol or LDL concentration [38].

    New understandings about protein for the Dietary Guidelines

    • Protein is a critical part of the adult diet

    Protein should be a central part of a complete diet for adults. While physical growth occurs only for a brief period of life, the need to repair and remodel muscle and bone continues throughout life. Protein needs become more important during periods of reduced food intake such as weight loss or during periods of recovery after illness or during aging.

    • Protein needs are proportional to body weight; NOT energy intake

    Protein needs for adults relate to body weight. The acceptable protein range is 10% to 35% of total energy. However, protein needs are constant across all energy intakes. So at low energy intakes, protein needs to be a higher percentage of total calories and at high energy intakes protein can be reduced as a percentage of total calories. In general, dietary protein should be established first in any diet in proportion to body weight and then carbohydrates and fats added determined by energy needs.

    • Optimal adult protein use is a function of intake at individual meals

    Protein is an important part of good nutrition at every meal. Vitamins and minerals can fulfill nutrient needs on a once-per-day basis but for protein the body has no ability to store a daily supply. To maintain healthy muscles and bones for adults, at least 30 g of protein should be consumed at more than one meal. Breakfast is an important meal for dietary protein because the body is in a catabolic state after an overnight fast. A meal with at least 30 g of protein is required to initiate repletion of body proteins. Protein at breakfast is also critical for regulation of appetite and daily food intake.

    • Most adults benefit from protein intakes above the minimum RDA

    Aging populations confront increasing incidence of obesity, osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, heart disease, and sarcopenia which have raised new questions about dietary ratios of carbohydrates, fats, and protein for life-long health. The RDA represents the minimum daily intake for active healthy adults. For most adults, replacing some dietary carbohydrates with protein will help to maintain body composition and mobility, improve blood lipids and lipoproteins, and help to control food intake.

    References

    1. Paddon-Jones D, Westman E, Mattes RD, Wolfe RR, Astrup A, Westerterp-Plantenga M: Protein, weight management, and satiety. Am J Clin Nutr 2008 , 87:1558S-1561S. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text Return to text

       

    2. Paddon-Jones D, Short KR, Campbell WW, Volpi E, Wolfe RR: Role of dietary protein in the sarcopenia of aging. Am J Clin Nutr 2008 , 87:1562S-1566S. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text

      aney RP, Layman DK: Amount and type of protein influences bone health.

    3. Am J Clin Nutr 2008 , 87:1567S-1570S. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURLReturn to text

       

    4. Layman DK, Clifton P, Gannon MC, Krauss RM, Nuttall FQ: Protein in optimal health: heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

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  • Munro HN, Crim MC: The protein and amino acids. In Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease 7th edition. Edited by: Shils ME, Young VR. 1988 , 1-37. OpenURL

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  • Kimball SR, Jefferson LS: Regulation of protein synthesis by branched-chain amino acids. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 2001 , 4:39-43. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Layman DK: The role of leucine in weight loss diets and glucose homeostasis.
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  • Schoeller DA, Buchholz AC: Energetics of obesity and weight control: does diet composition matter? J Am Diet Assoc 2005 , 105:S24-S28. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Weigle DS, Breen PA, Matthys CC, Callahan HS, Meeuws KE, Burden VR, et al.: A high-protein diet induces sustained reductions in appetite, ad libitum caloric intake, and body weight despite compensatory changes in diurnal plasma leptin and ghrelin concentrations.
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  • Westerterp-Plantenga MS, Rolland V, Wilson SAJ, Westerterp KR: Satiety related to 24-h diet-induced thermogenesis during high protein/carbohydrate vs high fat diets measured in a respiratory chamber. Eur J Clin Nutr 1999 , 53:495-502. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Layman DK, Baum JI: Dietary protein impact on glycemic control during weight loss.
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  • Gannon MC, Nuttall FQ, Saeed A, Jordan K, Hoover H: An increase in dietary protein improves the blood glucose response in persons with type 2 diabetes. Am J Clin Nutr 2003 , 78:734-41. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board: Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein and Amino Acids. Washington DC: National Academy Press; 2002.
  • Millward DJ: Macronutrient intakes as determinants of dietary protein and amino acid adequacy.
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  • Volpi E, Sheffield-Moore M, Rasmussen BB, Wolfe RR: Basal muscle amino acid kinetics and protein synthesis in healthy young and older men. JAMA 2001 , 286:1206-1212. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Volpi E, Mittendorfer B, Rasmussen BB, Wolfe RR: The response of muscle protein anabolism to combined hyperaminoacidemia and glucose-induced hyperinsulinemia is impaired in the elderly.
  • J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2000 , 85:4481-4490. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Millward DJ, Rivers JPW: The need for indispensable amino acids: the concept of the anabolic drive. Diabetes Metab Rev 1989 , 5(2):191-212. PubMed Abstract OpenURL

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  • Fujita S, Rasmussen BB, Cadenas JG, Drummond MJ, Glynn EL, Sattler FR, Volpi E: Aerobic exercise overcomes the age-related insulin resistance of muscle protein metabolism by improving endothelial function and Akt/mTOR signaling.
  • Diabetes 2007 , 56:1615-1622. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Arnal MA, Mosoni L, Boirie Y, Houlier ML, Morin L, Verdier E, Ritz P, Antoine JM, Prugnaud J, Beaufrere B, Mirand PP: Protein pulse feeding improves protein retention in elderly women. Am J Clin Nutr 1999 , 69:1202-1208. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Paddon-Jones D, Rasmussen BB: Dietary protein recommendations and the prevention of sarcopenia.
  • Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 2009 , 12:86-90. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • de Castro JM: The time of day of food intake influences overall intake in humans. J Nutr 2004 , 134:104-111. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • USDA/NHANES [http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place/12355000/pdf/Table_1_BIA.pdf] webcite
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  • USDA/NHANES [http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place/12355000/pdf/Table_9_BIA.pdf] webcite
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  • Rasmussen BB, Tipton KD, Miller SL, Wolf SE, Wolfe RR: An oral essential amino acid-carbohydrate supplement enhances muscle protein anabolism after resistance exercise.
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  • Garlick PJ: The role of leucine in the regulation of protein metabolism. J Nutr 2005 , 135:1553S-1556S. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Rolls BJ, Hetherington M, Burley VJ: The specificity of satiety: The influence of foods of different macronutrient content on the development of satiety.
  • Physiol Behav 1988 , 43:145-153. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Krieger JW, Sitren HS, Daniels MJ, Langkamp-Henken B: Effects of variation in protein and carbohydrate intake on body mass and composition during energy restriction: a meta-regression. Am J Clin Nutr 2006 , 83:260-274. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Layman DK, Walker DA: Protein importance of leucine in treatment of obesity and the metabolic syndrome.
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  • Layman DK, Evans EM, Erickson D, Seyler J, Weber J, Bagshaw D, Griel A, Psota T, Kris-Etherton P: A moderate-protein diet produces sustained weight loss and long-term changes in body composition and blood lipids in obese adults. J Nutr 2009 , 139:514-21. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Layman DK, Boileau RA, Erickson DJ, Painter JE, Shiue H, Sather C, Christou DD: A reduced ratio of dietary carbohydrate to protein improves body composition and blood lipid profiles during weight loss in adult women.
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  • Layman DK, Evans E, Baum JI, Seyler J, Erickson DJ, Boileau RA: Dietary protein and exercise have additive effects on body composition during weight loss in adult women. J Nutr 2005 , 135:1903-1910. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Margen S, Chu J, Kaufmann N, Calloway D: Studies in calcium metabolism. 1. The calciuretic effect of dietary protein.
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  • Kerstetter J, O’Brien K, Insogna K: Dietary protein affects intestinal calcium absorption. Am J Clin Nutr 1998 , 68:859-65. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Houston DK, Nicklas BJ, Ding J, Harris TB, Tylavsky FA, Newman AB, Lee JS, Sahyoun NR, Visser M, Kritchevsky SB: Dietary protein intake is associated with lean mass change in older, community-dwelling adults: the Health, Aging, and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study.
  • Am J Clin Nutr 2008 , 87:150-155. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Reaven GM: The metabolic syndrome: is this diagnosis necessary? Am J Clin Nutr 2006 , 83:1237-47. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL

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  • Walker-Lasker DA, Evans EM, Layman DK: Moderate carbohydrate, moderate protein weight loss diet reduces cardiovascular disease risk compared to high carbohydrate, low protein diet in obese adults: A randomized clinical trial.
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  • Isomaa B, Almgren P, Tuomi T, Forsen B, Lahti K, Nissen M, Taskinen MR, Groop L: Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with the metabolic syndrome. Diabetes Care 2001 , 24:683-689. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text  
  • The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/6/1/12
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    Probiotics in Pregnancy Could Have Diabetes Benefits

    British Journal of Nutrition 103(12):1792-1799, 2010

    In a new study published in the British Journal of Nutrition, researchers found that probiotic-supplemented dietary counseling could help reduce the risk of diabetes during pregnancy, improve blood glucose control and improve child health.

    Initiated in 2002, the study included 256 women, who were randomized during their first trimester of pregnancy into a control and dietary intervention group. The women, none of whom had any chronic diseases, all received dietary counseling provided by welfare clinics according to a national program.

    The intervention group received additional intensive dietary counseling provided by a nutritionist at every study visit, the aim being a dietary intake complying with current recommendations, combined with conventional food products with favorable fat and fiber contents for use at home, the researchers said.

    The intervention group was further randomized at baseline in a double-blind manner to receive either placebo capsules or probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium) at a dose of 1,010 colony-forming units per day each. The capsules were taken once per day and the intervention period extended from the first trimester of pregnancy to the end of exclusive breast-feeding.

    The researchers evaluated pregnancy outcome and fetal and infant growth during 24 months of follow-up. All pregnancies were of normal duration and there were no adverse events noted in mothers or in children, which confirms the safety of this approach, the researchers said.

    They noted that those women who had taken probiotics had a reduced frequency of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM): 13% for the diet/probiotics group, compared to 36% for the diet/placebo group and 34% for the control group. In addition, the dietary counseling during pregnancy reduced the risk of fetal overgrowth, which is thought to predispose to later obesity.

    “Probiotic intervention reduced the risk of GDM and dietary intervention diminished the risk of larger birth size in affected cases,” wrote the researchers. “The results of the present study show that probiotic-supplemented perinatal dietary counseling could be a safe and cost-effective tool in addressing the metabolic epidemic. In view of the fact that birth size is a risk marker for later obesity, the present results are of significance for public health in demonstrating that this risk is modifiable.”

    I recommend UltraFlora Plus DF from Metagenics for probiotics. Order @ www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

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    Eat Fat To Lose Fat?

    This continues to be a big topic. I am all about helping clients reduce body fat, heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, and dementia. It’s true, daily consumption of saturated fats (like coconut oil) can help reduce abdominal fat which helps reduce your risk of these other diseases.

    I recommend a whey protein powder by Metagenics called UltraMeal Plus 360 as a shake in the morning. I also recommend Meta Lipoate 300. I always tell clients that they have to stay on this program for at least for 12 weeks (daily shakes of UltraMeal Plus 360). Follow a balanced, low-carb diet with increased protein and fiber intake, start exercising with a 20-30 minute walk each day and I know changes will take place.

    Bad LDL cholesterol and good HDL cholesterol levels improve,
    body mass index improves, waistlines look better.

    Don’t be skeptical about saturated fat!

    What I am seeing is that people who eat the most saturated fat, the most cholesterol and the most protein calories weigh the least. I get my clients more physically active and they have the ideal serum cholesterol levels.

    Animal fats are not bad for you. They boost your energy and your immunity. They help your body build stronger and more resilient cells. They contain chemicals that help your brain stay focused, and even contain concentrated levels of ‘good’ HDL cholesterol.

    Let’s discuss your specific needs!

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    Get More Sleep

    Sleep Deficit…
    Almost every patient I see, especially those in chronic pain are sleeping less than they should. Looking back, adults slept eight to nine hours a night in 1960. By 1995 that average was down to seven hours. And now the average is just over six-and-a-half hours.

    Television, the internet, and crazy work schedules keep us up too late at night. I recommend turning off your cell phones and “crack” berries around nine o’clock.

    In a poll of 7,000 people, 52 percent said they were losing sleep from stress. So even if you are in bed, you may not be sleeping the whole time.

    Did you know that too little sleep raises the risk of diabetes? One study showed that people with insomnia who slept five to six hours total had twice the risk of diabetes. In those who slept fewer than five hours the risk was almost three times greater than someone who gets a full seven to nine hours.

    Sleep problems and diabetes go hand in hand. More than half of all people with type 2 diabetes have some sort of sleep disorder such as sleep apnea. At the same time, almost 40 percent of people with sleep apnea have diabetes – as well as a much higher risk of developing diabetes. That’s a strong correlation between sleep and diabetes.

    People in their late 20s and early 30s who slept less than six-and-a-half hours a night had the insulin sensitivity of someone more than 60 years old.

    A group of young adults in their 20s were studied in a sleep lab. Each time they started to drift into slow-wave deep sleep, they were subjected to sounds that disrupted their sleep but didn’t fully wake them up. After three nights of decreasing their slow-wave sleep by 90 percent (comparable to the slow-wave sleep of someone in their 60s), they became 25 percent less sensitive to insulin. The result was a 23 percent raise in blood glucose – the equivalent of gaining 20 to 30 pounds.

    Sleep habits of 276 subjects were analyzed for a six-year period. 20 percent of those who slept less than seven hours or more than eight hours developed diabetes or impaired blood glucose. Only seven percent of those who slept between seven and eight hours developed blood glucose problems.

    Things to enhance a good night’s sleep:
    Don’t let pets sleep with you.
    Alcohol might make you drowsy to start with, but then it turns around and wakes you up. Stop drinking several hours before bedtime to skip that effect.
    Go to bed and get up at the same time each day, even on weekends.
    Have a regular relaxing bedtime routine. Taking a hot shower or bath, or reading a chapter of a book will help you get ready to sleep.
    Make sure your sleep environment is dark and comfortable. Keep your computer out of the bedroom. Use eye shades, ear plugs or “white noise” if it helps you stay asleep.
    If your mattress is more than ten years old, it’s time for a new one.
    Finish exercising several hours before bedtime. Body temperature goes up during exercise and takes a while to drop. Cooler body temperatures are needed to go to sleep.
    Don’t eat anything too heavy or spicy at bedtime.
    Restrict fluids late in the evening so you aren’t awakened later to go to the bathroom..

    Use your bedroom only for sleep and sex.

    Bensom is a natural fomrula by Metagenics that I recommend to promote a restful, relaxed state and relieve occasional sleeplessness. It contains Melatonin and Passionflower.

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