All Posts tagged curcumin

Depression helped by spice

In a placebo controlled clinical trial that tested curcumin vs. an antidepressant drug, curcumin worked just as well as Prozac. Curcumin matched the drug in alleviating moodiness, anxiety, suicidal thoughts, insomnia, and other depressive symptoms.

Curcumin side effects: Zero.

Prozac side effects: Ever watch a drug commercial on TV!

In addition to the higher risk of dementia for drugs in this category, Prozac’s potential side effects include behavior changes, anxiety, agitation, hostility, hyperactivity, tremors, and insomnia. And — as with most antidepressants — depression may worsen.

A curcumin supplement is the way to go. I also recommend curcumin as a natural anti-inflammatory for my chronic low back pain patients.  In the depression study, 500 mg per day was enough to relieve anxiety, moodiness, and other depressive symptoms.

I recommend Xymogen’s Curcuplex tablets. Click the Xymogen link on the home page to order.

Sources: “Spice Extract Relieves Depression Effectively as Drugs: Study” Kathleen Walter, Nick Tate, Newsmax Health, 10/18/13

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Type 2 Diabetes & Turmeric – Curcuplex from Xymogen

When you eat food, the body breaks down all of the sugars and starches into glucose, which is the basic fuel for the cells in the body. Insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the cells. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going to cells, it can lead to diabetes complications.

Diabetes is a major cause of heart disease and stroke. Diabetes is also the leading cause of kidney failure, non-traumatic lower-limb amputations and new cases of blindness among adults in the U.S.

In this study, extracts from turmeric (curcumin) help manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Daily supplements of curcuminoids for three months was associated with improved glycemic control in 50 type 2 diabetics, compared to placebo, according to findings published in Molecular Nutrition & Food Research 2012.

Ccurcuminoids may have an anti-diabetic effect by decreasing serum fatty acid possibly through the promotion of fatty acid oxidation and utilization. Curcumin, the natural pigment that gives the spice turmeric its yellow color, has become one of my favorite supplements for patients with inflammation, arthritis, and those with stenosis. Curcumin has been linked to a range of health benefits, including potential protection against Alzheimer’s disease and protection against heart failure, diabetes and arthritis.

In this study the recommendation was 300 mg of curcuminoids per day for three months. I use much higher amounts for my stenotic patients in conjunction with laser therapy.

Results showed that the curcuminoids group displayed a significant decrease in blood glucose levels, hemoglobin A1C (a marker of the long-term presence of excess glucose in the blood), and insulin resistance, compared to placebo. There was also a significant reduction in free fatty acids in the curcuminoids group, the researchers said.

I feel that it is important to take curcuminoids as a supplement and I recommend Xymogens Curcuplex tablets.

Molecular Nutrition & Food Research.

 

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Curcumin

Daily supplements of curcumin may benefit cardiovascular health to the same extent as exercise for postmenopausal women (data from a clinical trial conducted in Japan and published in the journal Nutrition Research Nov 2012).

Vascular health, as measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD), improved equally in groups of women receiving the curcumin supplements and those receiving aerobic exercise training.

Another study, published recently in the British Journal of Nutrition indicated that decreased FMD is reported to be a predictor of future adverse cardiovascular events, with every one percent decrease in FMD associated with a 12% increase in risk.

I recommend regular ingestion of curcumin to my patients with spinal stenosis, numbness and tingling, spinal degeneration, and now with this report I’ll suggest it as a preventive measure against cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. If a women can’t exercise curcumin is an alternative.

Curcumin has been linked to a range of health benefits, including potential protection against Alzheimer’s and protection against heart failure, diabetes and more.

The new study suggests that endothelial function may also be added to the list of potential benefits from curcumin.

Researchers from the University of Tsukuba recruited 32 post-menopausal women and assigned them to one of three groups: The first group acted as the controls, the second group underwent an aerobic exercise training regimen and the third group received a daily dose of 25 mg of curcumin.

The study lasted for eight weeks, after which the results showed that FMD increased significantly and equally by about 1.5% in both the exercise and curcumin groups, compared with no changes in the control group.

“The mechanism responsible for the curcumin-ingestion-induced improvement in endothelial function is unclear,” the researchers said.

“Curcumin exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), suggesting that its effect on endothelial function may be mediated by the suppression of inflammation and/or oxidative stress via down-regulation of TNF-alpha. However, TNF-alpha levels were not assessed in this study.

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Alzheimer’s disease(AD).

Question: Jeff, my mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease(AD). Any suggestions? Answer: Beta-amyloid protein creates plaque that weakens nerve cell function in the brain.

Fortunately, there are several steps you can take that may reduce risk of amyloid buildup…
Exercise daily
Increase omega-3 fatty acid intake
Increase vitamins B6, B12, and folic acid intake (these vitamins reduce homocysteine, which has been linked to amyloid formation)
Use Supplementary curcumin (antioxidant and anti- inflammatory properties are believed to break up amyloid)
Increase intake of EGCG (a green tea flavonoid)

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