All posts in Healthy Aging

Sports Medicine & Cannabis Creams

Dr. Jeffrey Tucker, a sports medicine chiropractor and patent holder on a cannabis cream process says, “Cannabis creams help achy joints and sore muscles be less painful. Getting old doesn’t have to be the end of high quality performances.”

Dr. Tucker says “Continue to train at a level of intensity where you feel pushed every now and then and, stay motivated to be consistent with your workouts. Don’t overdo it each and every workout, we want you to remain injury-free.” Tucker finds that when an older person gets an injury it could take longer to recover and they lose ground in their training. Tucker recommends cannabis creams to his patients for sore joints and muscles.

By the time we are forty Tucker feels we should know our exercise capacity, in other words, the mileage you can walk or run without an injury, or the amount of weight you can lift without needing extra recovery days. Tucker also suggests men get there testosterone checked at age 30 so they have a base line for later in life. We can offer men natural supplements to help boost testosterone if they need it later in life. Estrogen dips dramatically after menopause but estrogen has a number of positive effects on workout performance, including boosting of cardiac output (amount of blood pumped from the heart per minute) and a preservation of bone density. Tucker notes that he has patients that use testosterone and estrogen with cannabis creams. Female athletes who don’t opt for postmenopausal estrogen-replacement therapy might suffer from weaker cardiac action, a higher incidence of stress fractures and greater overall rates of injury, all of which could downgrade performance and aerobic capacity by making consistent training more difficult. Estrogen-replacement therapy should be considered and women can determine how estrogen influences their performances over time.

Tucker encourages exercise intensity and says it is a greater producer of fitness than mileage. Therefore increasing the intensity and recovery and cutting back on the miles is the way to go! It’s easy to do! Here’s an example:

* Running six times a week for a total of 30 miles with 3 miles at a fast pace, can be changed to,
* Running five days a week for 25 miles with 4 miles at a fast pace.

The extra day recovery and less miles will decrease the risk of injury but increasing pace for an extra mile improves V02max, running economy, and competitive performances.

The idea of adding in more recovery seems to fit well with older athletes’ training needs. Tucker is a big advocate of cross training (swimming, walking, running, cycling, step machines, and weight training) and says his favorite exercises these days is isometrics and the Turkish Get Up. Everyone agrees that strength training is important for people over the age of 50 – when atrophy (wasting) of muscle and skeletal tissue begins to become a problem.

Final note: ALWAYS consult your doctor before embarking on a program of cannabis and strenuous exercise.

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Nutrition Chiropractor – Los Angeles

Gotu kola (a green leafy food) supports the formation of healthy connective tissue (hair, nails, lining of blood vessels). Supporting microvascular circulation is at the heart of facilitating vitality and healthy aging. Supporting healthy connective tissue maintains the integrity of blood flow in the tiniest places in the body. Your liver, eye retinas, kidneys, long nerves, bones, and joints all depend on healthy circulation.
Gotu kola by Standard Process also contains ginkgo and grape seed extract. We need a healthy amount of connective tissue but not so much that it builds up – Gotu kola keeps this hardening of tissues at bay and helps maintain function of the tissues by regulating both fibroblasts, which produce connective tissue, and fibroclasts, which break down connective tissue.
Dr. Jeffrey Tucker is a nutrition chiropractor in Los Angeles. You can call his office at
310-444-9393 and have Standard Process products shipped directly to you.

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Chiropractor Los Angeles

In the May 9, 2017 issue of the Journal of the AMA – an article titled “Introducing Genomics and Percision Health” was published. In this editorial, author W. Gregory Feero states: “To leverage advances in precision health, nongeneticist physicians must gain an adequate understanding of emerging technologies.” Why? Because of the shift in medicine “from an endeavor in which care for individual patients is driven by trial and error informed by studies designed to measure population outcomes to one in which care is selected based on a deep understanding of health and disease attributes unique to each individual.”

 

This sentence summarizes how I feel. “In the not-too-distant future, the coupling of sound science with an in-depth understanding of an individual’s characteristics, environmental exposures, and behaviors to achieve good health will probably simply be called quality care.”

 

This is what is happening – the convergence of genomics, social media, big data, biometrics, and systems biology with Functional Medicine and P4 Medicine (Predictive, Preventive, Personalized, and Participatory, as defined by Dr. Lee Hood).

Dr. Jeffrey Tucker, a Los Angeles Chiropractor “I have been a part of the new, health-focused medicine and chiropractic care for many years. My goal is to deliver precision, personalized lifestyle health care”.

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Fish oils – friend or foe

Consuming omega-3s help us defend against inflammatory diseases like heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. They help the brain and individual cell membranes.

The most important omega 3’s for our health and well-being are EPA (eicosapentanoic acid) and DHA (docosahexanoic acid). Also, DHA is very important for visual acuity and development of the brain.  Very little of EPA and DHA is converted to usable forms by the body and that’s why we need to supplement it in our diet.

I encourage fish oils especially if you have a family history of cancer, have depression and/or attention deficit disorders…it’s smart to increase your EPA and DHA. Aim to eat the food sources 
•    Cold water fatty fish (salmon, trout, sardine, mackerel, herring)
•    Shellfish (shrimp, mussels)
•    Marine algae
•    Krill

But if you are like me, I just don’t eat that much fish any more, so it’s important to supplement. 

I take my omega-3s from my supplement packets. Call the office if you would like them sent to you.
310-444-9393

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Fish Oil- Definitely YESSS!

I don’t care what you may have heard about taking fish oils in the media, I am definite about there positive health value. I find that the majority of my patients should take fish oil supplements.

Why Take Fish Oils

Three main reasons: 1) it benefits your brain 2)  it benefits your heart 3) it benefits your joints. Omega-3s play a role in protection against Alzheimer’s Disease, depression, and cancer; can help with acne, arthritis, psoriasis and other skin conditions; and can also help with inflammatory bowel disorders. It’s linked with improved brain function. The evidence FOR IT IS JUST TOO GOOD!

If you have a history of heart problems, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, high cholesterol, arthritis, chronic pain, depression, high blood pressure, diabetes, skin problems, or asthma, then you should probably supplement. If you’re concerned because you don’t eat more than two servings of fish a week, you should supplement. If you eat a lot of fish, don’t eat processed foods, and eat pastured animals and eggs, you may not need to supplement.

About Fish Oil Supplements

Like any oil you want it to be fresh and pure.  A good quality is about the type of fish, dosage, freshness, purity, and how natural it is. The best fish oils come from cold water fish. Look for oil that contains at least 60 percent Omega-3.

How Much to Take

The general consensus is that adults who don’t eat a lot of salmon, grass-fed beef, or other foods high in Omega-3 fatty acids and those who eat foods high in Omega 6 fatty acids (nuts, seeds, vegetable oils, and factory-farmed meats) should aim to get between two and four grams of EPA/DHA per day.

Which Fish Oil Should I Take? I recommend fish oil from Metagenics. I also recommendtrying  Krill oil from Xymogen. Take either gel capsuleds or liquid (depending on your desire). I don’t get fish oil burps with these brands! Go to my home page and click on these brand links to order.

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Alzheimer’s Update

New research suggests that oleocanthal found in olive oil may possess the ability to help the body rid itself of amyloid plaques found in Alzheimer’s Disease (the brain-degenerative disease). Amyloid plaques are thought to build up over time and cause irrevocable damage. A research team from the University of Louisiana at Monroe, led by Amal Kaddoumi, gave groups of mice oleocanthal from olive oil and found a consistent pattern of producing two proteins and key enzymes that are believed to be critical in the removal amyloid plaques, thereby preventing Alzheimer’s from occurring in the first place.

The team stated: “We provide in vitro and in vivo evidence for the potential of oleocanthal to enhance beta-amyloid clearance from the brain via up-regulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and LDL lipoprotein receptor related protein-1 (LRP1), major beta-amyloid transport proteins, at the blood-brain barrier.”

While traditionally noted for its high concentration of healthful monounsaturated fats, this research suggests that oleocanthal may be the actual protective agent. Researchers noted the results with certainty: “Our results demonstrated significant increase in beta-amyloid degradation as a result of the up-regulation of AB degrading enzymes following oleocanthal treatment,” they said.

Abuznait, et al. (2013). Olive-Oil Derived Oleocanthal Enhances B-Amyloid Clearance as a Potential Neuroprotective Mechanism Against Alzheimer’s Disease. Chemical Neuroscience. 

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Fitness Beats Weight Loss For Healthy Aging

  • From: Epidemiology and Prevention.
  • Title: Long-Term Effects of Changes on Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Body Mass Index on All-Cause and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in Men
  • Author: Duck-chul Lee
  • The Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study
  1. Abstract

Background—The combined associations of changes in cardiorespiratory fitness and body mass index (BMI) with mortality remain controversial  and uncertain.

Methods and Results—We examined the independent and combined associations of changes in fitness and BMI with all-cause and cardiovascular disease  (CVD) mortality in 14 345 men (mean age 44 years) with at least 2 medical examinations. Fitness, in metabolic equivalents  (METs), was estimated from a maximal treadmill test. BMI was calculated using measured weight and height. Changes in fitness  and BMI between the baseline and last examinations over 6.3 years were classified into loss, stable, or gain groups. During  11.4 years of follow-up after the last examination, 914 all-cause and 300 CVD deaths occurred. The hazard ratios (95% confidence  intervals) of all-cause and CVD mortality were 0.70 (0.59–0.83) and 0.73 (0.54–0.98) for stable fitness, and 0.61 (0.51–0.73)  and 0.58 (0.42–0.80) for fitness gain, respectively, compared with fitness loss in multivariable analyses including BMI change.  Every 1-MET improvement was associated with 15% and 19% lower risk of all-cause and CVD mortality, respectively. BMI change  was not associated with all-cause or CVD mortality after adjusting for possible confounders and fitness change. In the combined  analyses, men who lost fitness had higher all-cause and CVD mortality risks regardless of BMI change.

Conclusions—Maintaining or improving fitness is associated with a lower risk of all-cause and CVD mortality in men. Preventing age-associated fitness loss is important for longevity regardless of BMI change.

dr. Tucker’s thoughts:  I think it is important to keep your weight at a healthy level, this study found that weight loss (defined as lowering a person’s body-mass index) was not associated with a reduction in the risk of all-cause mortality (dying from anything) or cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality.

What the researchers did find is that those men who keep their fitness level stable significantly reduced their risk of all-cause and CVD death. Men who were able to increase their fitness level as they got older saw even greater reductions in their risk of death.

I say stay physically fit doing regular exercise, including cardio, flexibility, balance and resistance training. Eat well and stay within a healthy body composition range and you will have even more benefits.

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Osteoporosis & Vitamin C Update

Journal PLoS One provides evidence that vitamin C, when ingested orally, can prevent bone loss (osteoporosis) and stimulate the formation of new bone (in mice).

The medical world has known for some time that low amounts of vitamin C can cause scurvy and brittle bones, and that higher vitamin C intake is associated with higher bone mass in humans.

Large doses of vitamin C, when ingested orally by mice, actively stimulate bone formation to protect the skeleton. It does this by inducing osteoblasts, or premature bone cells, to differentiate into mature, mineralizing specialty cells.

This data provides compelling evidence for a therapeutic potential for vitamin C. Mice with ovariectomies were divided into two groups, one of which was given large doses of vitamin C over eight weeks. The team then measured the bone mineral density in the lumbar spine, femur and tibia bones. The lead researcher Zaidi revealed that mice who received an ovariectomy without vitamin C had a much lower bone mineral density than those that received a “sham” operation. Mice with no ovaries but given large doses of vitamin C had roughly the same bone mineral density as the controls, suggesting vitamin C prevented bone density losses in this group.

Could simple inexpensive dietary supplements versus expensive drugs help prevent osteoporosis? I think so! I also like to use Ostera from Metagenics.

PLoS One.

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Omega-3s May Slow Biological Aging

Omega-3 fatty acids may improve the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids and slow a key biological process linked to aging. Data published in Brain, Behavior, and Immunity indicated that four months of supplementation with omega-3s was associated with longer telomeres in immune system cells. Telomeres are DNA sequences at the end of chromosomes that shorten as cells replicate and age.

The aging and lifespan of normal, healthy cells are linked to the so-called telomere shortening mechanism, which limits cells to a fixed number of divisions. During cell replication, the telomeres function by ensuring the cell’s chromosomes do not fuse with each other or rearrange. Most researchers liken telomeres to the ends of shoelaces, without which the lace would unravel. With each replication the telomeres shorten, and when the telomeres are totally consumed, the cells are destroyed.

Some experts have noted that telomere length may be a marker of biological aging.
This information suggests the possibility that omega 3 supplements might actually make a difference in aging.

A previous observational study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 2010 (Vol. 303, Pages 250-257) showed high blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids may slow cellular aging in people with coronary heart disease.

Professor Kiecolt-Glaser and co-workers recruited 106 healthy, sedentary, overweight, middle-aged and older adults to participate in their double-blind four-month trial. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: The first group received 2.5 grams per day of omega-3, the second group received 1.25 grams per day of omega-3 and the third group received placebo capsules.

After four months of supplementation, results showed that omega-3 supplementation significantly decreased measures of oxidative stress, with F2-isoprostane levels found to be 15% lower in the two supplemented groups compared to placebo.

There were no significant differences in telomerase and telomere length between the groups. However, a decreased ratio of omega-6:omega-3 was associated with longer telomeres, which suggested that lower omega-6:omega-3 ratios “can impact cell aging,” the researchers said.

Inflammatory markers also decreased by between 10% and 12% as a result of omega-3 supplementation, while levels increased by 36% in the placebo group.

“This finding strongly suggests that inflammation is what’s driving the changes in the telomeres,” said Kiecolt-Glaser.

Brain, Behavior, and Immunity; Published online ahead of print.

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Cholesterol and Statins

I don’t worry as much about people’s cholesterol level, I worry about their overall risk of heart disease. Too many practitioners are fixed on just LDL cholesterol and this leads to the overuse of statin drugs.

There are two common treatment approaches:

1) “Treat-to-target”–an approach that uses statins to force LDL cholesterol to less than 70 for high-risk patients and no higher than 130 for people not at risk
2) “Tailored treatment”–an approach that gives far less importance to LDL level, while weighing multiple risk factors to develop a variety of treatments including exercise, diet modification, etc.

Tailored treatment will prevent more coronary artery disease events while treating fewer people with high-dose statins.

Years ago, the Framingham Heart Study showed that total cholesterol levels below 160 caused heart disease problems to RISE! So it’s been well known for decades that low lower lowest is not good better best.

There is research on subjects in their 70’s that found elevated levels of total cholesterol were linked with REDUCED dementia risk in their later 70s. And elevated cholesterol throughout their 70s was associated with reduced dementia risk throughout their 80s.

Let’s talk about natural alternatives to the high cholesterol issue and reducing the risk of dementia as we age.

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