All posts in Daily Exercises

Resistance Exercise

Resistance Exercise Promotes Release of Neurotrophic Factors

June 4, 2010 (Baltimore, Maryland) — New research presented at the
American College of Sports Medicine 57th Annual Meeting shows that
circulating levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) increase
after intense resistance training, which might explain why exercise is
effective at protecting and improving brain function.

The incidence of neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer’s disease,
is lower in people who participate in endurance exercise on a regular
basis, noted Joshua Yarrow, PhD, lead researcher and postdoctoral
associate at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/723059?sssdmh=dm1.620579&src=nldne&uac=15003AN

More

Weight Loss Tips

1. Find an “accountability” partner. It helps if that person is supportive, positive, and will encourage you in your weight loss efforts. Often times you will want to look outside of your family members and best friends for support. Tell your accountability partner what you’re doing, what your goals are and how they can best support you. Talk to them on a regular basis and anytime you are struggling and need support.

2. Be as intentional as you can by telling people what you are doing. Don’t be afraid to tell people about your intention.

3. Begin working out even if it is only 10-15 minutes per day. If you are already working out regularly, it’s time to step up the intensity again! In the morning, do a 4 minute circuit of squats and lunges. Add a 4 minute circuit of some push ups, bridges and abs. Then add another 2 minutes of running in place or jumping jacks. In the evening do the same thing. So that’s 10 minutes of work in the morning and 10 minutes in the evening for a total of 20 minutes of workout time. Keep the exercises simple – don’t feel like you have to be at the gym to workout. Do it at home or at work.

4. Go shopping. This is an important part of the process. Find an outfit that you really, really want, and find it in the size that you want to be. Buy it in the size that you will be wearing when you lose all the weight you want to lose (not just the 10 pounds). So if you want to lose 25 pounds total, buy it in the size you’ll be wearing after your 25 pound weight loss. Make sense?

When you get the outfit, I want you to hang it up somewhere you can see it every day, like on your bathroom door or closet door. If you can’t buy the outfit today, find a picture of it in a magazine or on the internet, cut it out and post it somewhere where you will see it everyday, like your bathroom mirror or refrigerator.

5. Make one simple nutrition change this week. Make sure it is simple and easy to do. Cut out bread, a muffin or a bagel! Drinking 2 sodas a day? Cut down to 1. Skipping breakfast every day? Pledge to make a protein shake for breakfast 3 times per week. Add a glass of water or an extra vegetable serving to your diet.

Now what I want you to do is to leave a comment and tell me what outfit you’re going to buy and what nutrition change you’re making. I can’t wait to hear what you come up with!

If you have read this far I know you are serious. I love that you have a goal, but I need you to dig way deeper. If fitting into your outfit was so important, you would have done it by now, right? Guys, you need this too. Most of you have a belly to lose. Are you feeling good enough to go shirtless? I need you to ask yourself “Why? is it important for you to lose weight (or go shirtless) and look amazing in that outfit. Take out a piece of paper or your journal and a pen and keep asking yourself the question Why? Your first response may be simple, “I want to look good for my significant other”. “Why” is this important? Keep asking yourself “why” over and over again until you come up with a reason that is really emotional for you, one that will keep you going when you want to give up.

Sit down with a blank piece of paper or a journal and a pen. Go to a room where you won’t be disturbed. Now imagine yourself wearing your favorite outfit that you picked out. Imagine how you feel wearing that outfit or going shirtless. Who do you see? What compliments do you get? If you’re wearing a little black dress, maybe you’re at a party. If you’re in your swimsuit, you might be on a beautiful beach. What are you wearing? A fitted shirt to show off your new lean physique? Who is looking at you and noticing you. Write down exactly what it is like to wear your outfit, who you’re with, how you feel and what you are doing. Be as specific as possible and write it down in the present tense, as if it is happening now – not the future tense. Take about 10 minutes for this.

More

Alzheimer’s disease(AD).

Question: Jeff, my mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease(AD). Any suggestions? Answer: Beta-amyloid protein creates plaque that weakens nerve cell function in the brain.

Fortunately, there are several steps you can take that may reduce risk of amyloid buildup…
Exercise daily
Increase omega-3 fatty acid intake
Increase vitamins B6, B12, and folic acid intake (these vitamins reduce homocysteine, which has been linked to amyloid formation)
Use Supplementary curcumin (antioxidant and anti- inflammatory properties are believed to break up amyloid)
Increase intake of EGCG (a green tea flavonoid)

More

Balance Training

This article appeared in the California Chiropractic Journal
In-Office Rehab and Balance Training by Dr. Jeffrey Tucker, DC

The doctors that I get to teach, and those that I meet who include exercise therapy in their practice appear to create better client satisfaction and experience better patient retention. Patients enjoy the participation in their care that exercise therapy provides.
More than thirty-five years ago, when I was a teenager, going to the gym and working out was for kids and parents who already had an active lifestyle. The typical ‘old school’ gym program included a ten minute bike or treadmill warm up, a 40-50 minute strength training regime—usually in a muscle group split, and then on “off-days,” 20-30 minutes of cardio.

Today’s ‘new school’ exercise programs consists of foam roll therapy (self myofascial release) for 10 minutes, stretching of overactive muscles for 5-10 minutes, core stability exercises for 5-10 minutes, balance training for 5 minutes, reactive training and speed, agility and quickness training for 5-10 minutes, intense strength training for 20-25 minutes, metabolic/cardiovascular training for 10-15 minutes and 5 minutes for cooling down.

Many clients that come to us may already be doing any or all of these exercise strategies on their own at home or in the gym. My role as a rehab specialist is to write corrective exercise programs, teach clients how to perform the exercises and guide them into progressions that help eliminate pain.

Additional therapeutic goals may include injury prevention, decreased body fat, increased lean muscle mass, increased strength, increased endurance, increased flexibility, and enhanced performance.

You can have a very successful exercise practice in your office using Therabands, especially the ones with handles, a barbell, dumbbells, kettlebells, a sturdy exercise bench that inclines, a swiss ball, a wobble board, or rocker board, or bosu.

I break up each of the “new school” categories of exercise in my in-office treatment sessions. After the acute care phase, I start by training clients in the use of the 3-foot-by-6-inchwide foam roll. This method of self myofascial release is used to inhibit overactive muscles. Holding pressure on the tender areas of tissue (trigger points) for a sustained period of time, usually 30 seconds per tender point,can diminish trigger point activity. Patients are expected to use the foam roll at home on their own. This is followed by a session where I teach clients how to stretch.

Following use of the foam roll, the application of a lengthening technique (static stretching) resets the muscle lengths and provides for optimal length-tension relationships. Once patients are foam rolling and stretching at home, the subsequent in-office session is used to teach isolated strengthening exercises. This session time is used to teach clients how to isolate and exercise a particular muscle. For example, a common underactive muscle is the gluteus medius. The side lying hip abduction exercise would be taught to increase the force production capabilities through concentric-eccentric muscle actions.

Isolated exercises focus on the muscles of the body that have synergistic function of the stabilization and mobilization system.

Additional sessions are required to train clients in integrated dynamic strengthening exercises. This will ensure an increase in intra- and intermuscular coordination, endurance strength and optimal force-couple relationships that will produce proper arthrokinematics.

An important exercise therapy often overlooked by clinicians, is that prior to resistance training, balance training should be performed, because it has preconditioning effects
on strength training. Our everyday clients face the challenges of keeping balance to perform activities such as playing with their children or grandchildren, walking on uneven surfaces or even taking a walk in their neighborhood.

‘New school’ exercise programs realize balance is a skill-related component of physical fitness. It is important to incorporate balance training in every client’s corrective exercise program as an integrated component to a comprehensive training regimen.

Balance can be influenced by many factors. As we age, our ability to balance or maintain postural control decreases. Watch seniors maneuver steps and stairs. Those who lack the ability to decelerate and control their center of gravity have a significant risk potential of a devastating fall. Prior injuries, especially after ankle sprains, ligamentous injuries to the knee, and low back pain can also decrease an individual’s ability to balance.

A joint dysfunction in the ankle, knee, shoulder, or low back can lead to muscle inhibition. An acute joint injury may cause joint swelling, which results in an interruption in the internal communication process of the body–sensory input from receptors such as articular, ligamentous, and muscular mechanoreceptors to the central nervous system. In turn, this changes our proprioceptive capabilities. When sensory input to the central nervous system is altered, our movement system may become imbalanced.
Repetitive recruitment of the wrong muscle fibers, in the same ROM/Plane of motion and at the same speed, creates tissue overload and eventual injury. Consequentially, this can lead to neuromuscular inefficiency, resulting in decreased balance and postural instability.

Recovery from injury needs to include repairing faulty movement patterns (alterations in stability) and correcting inefficient neuromuscular control. Through balance training,
the central nervous system can be exercised to change and improve a lack of joint stabilization that is causing functional instability.

Don’t forget to address balance as a component of a training program. Balance training may be used not only for reconditioning clients post injury, but also as a preventative measure to increase postural stability and reduce the chances of injury.

Dr. Jeffrey Tucker, D.C., D.A.C.R.B, is
a rehabilitation specialist, author,
lecturer, and healer best known
for his holistic approach in supporting
the body’s inherent healing
mechanisms and for integrating
the art and science of chiropractic,
exercise, nutrition and attitudinal
health. He instructs for the National
Academy of Sports Medicine and
the Chiropractic Rehabilitation Association.
He practices in West Los
Angeles, CA.

More

Pre-Workout Foods: Protein Bar vs. Eggs?

• Eating 60 to 90 minutes before exercising helps to prevent light-headedness and loss of concentration during moderate to high-intensity activity. You’ll need a simple fat, sugar and protein combination—this balance can be found in both a healthy breakfast food or an UltraMeal Bar or UltraMeal shake (Metagenics link).
• Which will power you through your workout without a crash? Try two eggs one day and a bar the next. A bar is easy, but the eggs are real. Both are filling food, and pack good protein. Egg whites are the purest form of muscle-building fuel available.

Whatever you choose just get going on your exercise and be consistent!

• Are Eggs good for me?
• Eggs contain tons of important vitamins and minerals, and egg whites contain the purest form of protein available in whole foods—exactly what you’ll need to feed your muscles during a workout.

More

Anti-Aging Exercises

One Leg Stand

Attempt to balance on one leg, with eyes closed. Shoes off!

Hold for 20 seconds.
Repeat 3 times per side, per set.
One set per session.
Complete 1 session per day.

Step Down/Step Up

Stand on chair or 18″ stool. Slowly bend right leg, lowering other foot to the floor. Return by straightening front leg.

Repeat 20 times per set.
Two sets per session.
Complete 1 session per day.

Deep Squat

Stand with feet shoulder/hip width apart. Squat deeply, as far as you can. Keep head and chest up and heels on the floor.

Build up to 50 squats per set.
One set per session.
Complete 1 session per day.

Opposite Arms/Knees

Lie on back with feet flat, arms straight up and palms together. Slowly rotate head and hips to one side, arms and shoulders to the opposite side. Feet will fall to the side following knees and hips.

Repeat 20 times per side, per set.
One set per session.
Complete 2 sessions per day.

More