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Anti-aging: Muscle Loss As We Age

Muscle wasting loss begins as early as age 25. From age 25-50 the rate of muscle loss is up to 0.5 pound/year. From age 50-late 60s the loss accelerates at up to one pound/year. After that it goes as high as 2 pounds per year to your early to mid
eighties. If you are lucky enough to make it to your mid 80s, muscle loss goes up to four pounds per year. Increase is not
linear but exponential loss.

Dr. Tucker’s comment on these stats: The purpose of exercise is to improve your functional capability and allow you to maintain your activities of daily living. I don’t think exercise is just to burn calories. When I teach clients how to exercise it is to maintain flexibility, strength and endurance. Calories will take care of themselves if you eat right, the best example being a Paleo diet or Mediteranian diet.

See my exercise article at http://www.toyourhealth.com/mpacms/tyh/article.php?id=1277

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Weight Loss: Fast or Slow?

If you thought the best way to lose and maintain weight was the slow and steady approach, think again. A new study by Lisa Nackers and colleagues, from the University of Florida in the US, suggests that the key to long-term weight loss and maintenance is to lose weight quickly, not gradually, in the initial stages of obesity treatment. Their findings(1) are published online in Springer’s International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

Successful weight loss in obese individuals is defined as a reduction of 10 percent or more of initial body weight maintained for at least a year. The jury is still out, however, as to whether fast or slow initial weight loss is the best approach for long-term weight control in obese patients. On the one hand, there is evidence that losing weight slowly initially results in continued weight loss, reduced risk of weight regain, and successful long-term weight loss maintenance. On the other hand, it has also been shown that the greater the initial weight loss in obese patients, the larger the total weight loss observed longer term.

continued on MedicalNewsToday.com

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Chromium Picolinate May Boost Memory in Elderly

June 2010
Supplements of chromium picolinate may boost memory function in the elderly, says a new placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

Scientists from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine report that daily supplements of the compound improved learning, recall and recognition memory tasks.

Researchers stated: “Insulin resistance is implicated in the pathophysiological changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease and pharmaceutical treatments that overcome insulin resistance improve memory function in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early Alzheimer’s disease.

Chromium supplementation improves glucose disposal in patients with insulin resistance and diabetes.” Chromium is an essential trace mineral that occurs naturally in small amounts in some foods, including brewer’s yeast, lean meat, cheese, pork kidney and whole grain breads and cereals. It is poorly absorbed by the human body but is known to play an important role in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and proteins.”

Twenty-six older adults were recruited to participate in the study and they were randomly assigned to 1,000 micrograms of chromium picolinate per day (Chromax®, Nutrition 21) or placebo capsules for 12 weeks.

Researchers concluded: “Memory and depression were assessed prior to treatment initiation and during the final week of treatment. We also performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans on a subset of subjects. Although learning rate and retention were not enhanced by chromium picolinate (CrPic) supplementation, we observed reduced semantic interference on learning, recall and recognition memory tasks. In addition fMRI indicated comparatively increased activation for the CrPic subjects in right thalamic, right temporal, right posterior parietal and biofrontal regions. These findings suggest that supplementation with CrPic can enhance cognitive inhibitory control and cerebral function in older adults at risk for neurodegeneration.”

Nutritional Neuroscience 13(3):116-122, 2010

Comments: I recommend 2 shakes per day of the UltraGlycemX 360 powder or MetaGlycemX (2 tabs per day) or Chromium Picolinate (3 tabs per day) to achieve the proper dose. These are sold by Metagenics.

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A personal question…

What do I enjoy the most about my job?
1. Helping clients lose weight while teaching them about eating real foods.
2. Helping clients maximize there energy.
3. Teaching clients exercises that help them burn more calories.
4. Writing & teaching exercise programs that build lean, solid muscle.
5. Improve clients endurance…inlife and in sport.
6. Train exercises that increase your flexibility.
7. Providing emotional support.

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Efficacy of Low-Level Laser Therapy for Body Contouring and Spot Fat Reduction.

Caruso-Davis MK, Guillot TS, Podichetty VK, Mashtalir N, Dhurandhar NV, Dubuisson O, Yu Y, Greenway FL.
School of Human Ecology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803, USA.

Obes Surg. 2010 Apr 15. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 20393809 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

BACKGROUND: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is commonly used in medical applications, but scientific studies of its efficacy and the mechanism by which it causes loss of fat from fat cells for body contouring are lacking. This study examined the effectiveness and mechanism by which 635-680 nm LLLT acts as a non-invasive body contouring intervention method.
METHODS: Forty healthy men and women ages 18-65 years with a BMI < 30 kg/m(2) were randomized 1:1 to laser or control treatment. Subject's waistlines were treated 30 min twice a week for 4 weeks. Standardized waist circumference measurements and photographs were taken before and after treatments 1, 3, and 8. Subjects were asked not to change their diet or exercise habits. In vitro assays were conducted to determine cell lysis, glycerol, and triglyceride release. RESULTS: Data were analyzed for those with body weight fluctuations within 1.5 kg during 4 weeks of the study. Each treatment gave a 0.4-0.5 cm loss in waist girth. Cumulative girth loss after 4 weeks was -2.15 cm (-0.78 +/- 2.82 vs. 1.35 +/- 2.64 cm for the control group, p < 0.05). A blinded evaluation of standardized pictures showed statistically significant cosmetic improvement after 4 weeks of laser treatment. In vitro studies suggested that laser treatment increases fat loss from adipocytes by release of triglycerides, without inducing lipolysis or cell lysis. CONCLUSIONS: LLLT achieved safe and significant girth loss sustained over repeated treatments and cumulative over 4 weeks of eight treatments. The girth loss from the waist gave clinically and statistically significant cosmetic improvement. Dr. Tucker's Comment: I have used the warm laser coupled with the Deep Muscle Stimulator (DMS) in conjunction with the 28 day cleanse and seen very good results. Patient's actually lost weight in the thighs and buttocks.

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Chocolate Milk for Post-exercise Recovery

American College of Sports Medicine suggests one of the best post-exercise recovery drinks is chocolate milk. It offers a recovery advantage to help repair and rebuild muscles, compared to specially designed carbohydrate sports drinks.

Experts agree that the two-hour window after exercise is an important, yet often neglected, part of a fitness routine. After strenuous exercise, this post-workout recovery period is critical for active people at all fitness levels – to help make the most of a workout and stay in top shape for the next workout.

The new research suggests that drinking fat free chocolate milk after exercise can help the body retain, replenish and rebuild muscle to help your body recover. Drinking lowfat chocolate milk after a strenuous workout could even help prep muscles to perform better in a subsequent bout of exercise.
MedicalNewsToday.com

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Laser Therapy May Improve Outcomes in Fibromyalgia

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/723164?sssdmh=dm1.621178&src=nldne&uac=15003AN

June 8, 2010 (Baltimore, Maryland) — New data presented at the American College of Sports Medicine 57th Annual Meeting suggest that the application of class 4 infrared light lasers to fibromyalgia trigger points improves upper body flexibility. This finding is important because fibromyalgia is often difficult to treat with pharmacologic agents, and patients seek alternative regimens to ease their discomfort.

39 women (52 ± 11 years of age) were randomly assigned to receive 8 minutes of laser therapy or sham heat therapy twice per week for 4 weeks. Treatment consisted of the application of laser therapy or sham heat therapy to 8 standardized points located across the neck, shoulders, and low back.

The impact of laser therapy on upper body flexibility in patients treated with laser therapy was significant, compared with those treated with sham heat therapy. However, there was no improvement in functionality or pain score between the 2 groups. There was an increase in the amount of time between bouts of severe pain in laser-treated patients, compared with sham-treated patients.

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What’s wrong with sitting?

I typically see:
tight hip flexors, hamstrings, calves
tightness through the external hip rotators, leading to restriction in hip joint range
limitation of lumbar spine extension
stiff thoracic spine
protracted and elevated scapulas with weak lower trapezius and serratus anterior
tight and weak posterior rotator cuff
poked chin posture with associated weak deep neck flexors and overactive upper trapezius, levator scapula and rhomboid muscles.

Prolonged sitting has also been linked to hamstring strains. The lumbar spine stiffness associated with sitting leads to altered neural input into the posterior thigh, the theory goes. This can manifest as increased muscle tone of the hamstrings, which will alter the length-tension relationship and increase the risk of strain.

Hunched postures cause thoracic spine stiffness, shoulder imbalance and winged scapulas.

Each of my clients is encouraged to correct their posture, perform a daily flexibility program and take a look at the ergonomics of their work-stations to help them regain the alignment and muscle balances that are essential for them to achieve their best health.

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Varicose Viens & Vitamin K

Varicose veins are caused by a variety of factors: genetic inclination, standing occupations, obesity, or multiple pregnancies.

In a 2007 study from France’s University of Nantes, researchers examined 36 healthy male subjects and 50 male subjects with varicose veins. They found a link between varicosis and inactivity of a protein called matrix GLA protein (MGP). And because MGP is properly activated only when vitamin K levels are adequate, researchers theorize that sufficient intake of the vitamin may play a role in the prevention of varicose veins.

The importance of vitamin K intake for circulatory health is already well known. Dr. Tucker recommends 5 to 15 mg of vitamin K per day – considerably higher than the recommended daily allowance.

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