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From Laser to ELDOA – Los Angeles Sports Medicine

I frequently go to seminars where I teach and where I am also a student. I look for new tools and techniques that will help my patients and enhance my practice. I strive to help my patients feel their best.

Although there are hundreds of musculoskeletal techniques to consider specializing in, I am a specialist in these 11 techniques. Each year I would pick at least one technique protocol or method that I wanted to learn and bring to my practice and become an expert in. I have been in active practice for over 35 years. These are my specialties:

Laser therapy: The use of laser therapy improves healing. It can be used to increase blood flow and oxygen to the tissue, relax tight muscles, and decrease pain. I can deliver laser with two systems – one called a class 4 laser and the other a class 3B medical device.
Fascial and Stretching: I’ve mastered the art of various types of hands on stretching protocols used by sports medicine specialist and pro-athletes. More people are aware of the benefits of stretching, but don’t know when or how to apply stretching.
Deep Tissue Massage: This technique involves a heavier touch that uses tools to release restrictions and scar tissue in and along the joints and spinal segments. I use this technique to address chronic pain in the soft tissues.
Cupping: I have a very unique machine called the PhysioTouch that creates suction and negative pressure. This helps soften tight muscles, tone attachments, loosen adhesions, lift connective tissue, hydrate and increase blood flow to body tissues, and drain excess fluids and toxins by opening lymphatic pathways.
Deep Muscle Stimulator (DMS): This vibration/percussion machine is used to increase blood flow and oxygen to the tissues. This restores muscular balance. Hospitals in China offer this therapy as a way to help patients relax, heal and improve sports performance. This is my patients most popular tool to stimulate blood flow, relax the muscles, reduce stiffness, and increase mobility.
Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (IASTM): This is also known as scraping. I use these tools to decrease scar tissue, improve fascial adhesions and increase ranges of motion. It fits in well with movement therapy. I have a set of GRASTON and FAKTR tools.
Shockwave Therapies: These are pain-relief tools that emit acoustic waves that are especially helpful for tendon injuries. This is also known as EPAT or ESWT and can be used in combination with massage therapy to address pain, injury, scar tissue and cellulite. The effectiveness of shockwave, laser, and DMS massage combined is a valuable combination that helps patients leave a session more limber and relaxed.
Transverse Friction Technique: The application of transverse friction massage techniques is an advanced skill for breaking up scar tissue also known as fibrosis. This also helps loosen tight and stiff joints.
Myofascial Release: A method of affecting connective tissue by applying pressure in the direction of fascial resistance. Insights and studies into the nature of fascia are showing that everything under the skin is connected.
ELDOA: Using knowledge of various approaches, a French Osteopath applied clinical reasoning skills to determine how to address decreased disc space and train practitioners how to isolate postures and positions that you hold for one minute that help unload specific spinal segments.
Taping: The practice of applying sports tape to the skin to provide a gentle increase in the microcirculation can help ease muscular tension, improve blood and lymphatic circulation, and extend the benefits of treatment beyond the end of the session. Taping is effective for both sports-minded and mobility-impaired patients.

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