Blog

OSTEITIS PUBIS | ATHLETIC PUBALGIA

Osteitis pubis is a painful overuse injury of the pubic symphysis and the surrounding bone area. This is typically found in athletes whose sports involve kicking, rapid accelerations, decelerations, and abrupt directional changes. This is often seen in soccer, rugby, football players, and distance runners with complaints of groin pain.1

Specific complaints include anterior and/or medial groin pain. Some patients also point to the lower abdominal area, adductor muscles, inguinal region, perineal area, and/or scrotal area and describe “pain”. Symptoms can be severe and can limit participation in sports until proper treatment is instituted.

TREATMENT FOR GROIN, HIP, AND PELVIC PAIN

Get a good evaluation by a doctor who understands sports injuries. I treat a lot of persistent groin pain due to chronic repetitive trauma and overuse stress. If it involves the pelvic joints, the muscles, and/or tendons a Chiropractor is a good first choice.

I usually find insertional tendinopathy accompanied with pubic symphysis irritation, so Shockwave is a good first line of therapy. I am the only practitioner we know of who has 3 different types of shockwave machines.

Prolotherapy and Platelet Rich Plasma Therapy may be a useful treatment for this diagnosis as well.2,3 In some cases of advanced deterioration I am hearing players using Stem Cells. We have many patients combining treatments like laser, shockwave, and injections to accelerate healing.

  1. Scholten PM, Massimi S, Dahmen N, Diamond J, Wyss J. Successful treatment of athletic pubalgia in a lacrosse player with ultrasound-guided needle tenotomy and platelet-rich plasma injection: a case report. PM R. 2015 Jan;7(1):79-83. doi: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2014.08.943. Epub 2014 Aug 16.
  2. Beatty T. Groin Pain Osteitis pubis in athletes. Curr Sports Med Rep. 2012 Mar-Apr;11(2):96-8. Groin Pain Osteitis pubis citations
  3. Topol GA, Reeves KD: Regenerative injection of elite athletes with career-altering chronic groin pain who fail conservative treatment: a consecutive case series. Am J Phys Med Rehabil 2008;87

Leave a Reply