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Low Back Pain Chiropractor

 

Chronic low back pain serves no known helpful purpose. “Back pain is complex to diagnose and expensive to treat. The implications of chronic unremitting low back pain on health quality, worker productivity, and social dynamics are marked. As with any area of medicine, inaccurate diagnosis leading to treatments that do not target the underlying disease exposes patients to risk without benefit (University of Minnesota’s Department of Orthopedic Surgery). It is my opinion that patients should exhaust non-invasive treatments before scheduling back surgery. I am not opposed to surgery but (only) approximately 60% of patients derive clinically important benefits from lumbar surgery.”1 The key to success is patient selection and the proper procedure. Failed back surgery syndrome is self-explanatory and all too common.

 

In the August 3, 2016 edition of the New York Times, an important update on back pain was written by author Gina Kolata. She concluded: Surgery was no better than alternative nonsurgical treatments, like supervised exercise and therapy to help patients deal with their fear of back pain. In both groups, the pain usually diminished or went away.

 

As a sports medicine and chronic pain specialist I treat chronic low back pain with a combination of modalities such as TheraLase laser, Light Force laser, EnPuls shockwave therapy, PiezoWave acoustic wave therapy, SCENAR, Ketogenic diet, supplements, ergonomics, and gentle movement. These treatments are being given the new name of “regenerative chiropractic care”. If you have acute or chronic pain you may require stabilizing the spine, but please, first try by non-surgical repair of muscles, tendons and ligaments.

 

1 Polly DW, Cher D. Ignoring the sacroiliac joint in chronic low back pain is costly. ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research: CEOR. 2016;8:23-31. doi:10.2147/CEOR.S97345.

2 Schütz U1, Grob D. Poor outcome following bilateral sacroiliac joint fusion for degenerative sacroiliac joint syndrome. Acta Orthop Belg. 2006 Jun;72(3):296-308.

  1. Shaffrey CI, Smith JS. Editorial: Stabilization of the sacroiliac joint. Neurosurg Focus. 2013 Jul;35(2 Suppl):Editorial. doi: 10.3171/2013.V2.FOCUS13273.
  2. el Barzouhi A, Vleggeert-Lankamp CL, Lycklama à Nijeholt GJ, Van der Kallen BF, van den Hout WB, Koes BW, Peul WC; Leiden-Hague Spine Intervention Prognostic Study Group. Predictive value of MRI in decision making for disc surgery for sciatica. J Neurosurg Spine. 2013 Dec;19(6):678-87. doi: 10.3171/2013.9.SPINE13349. Epub 2013 Oct 18.
  3. Kurosawa D, Murakami E, Ozawa H, Koga H, Isu T, Chiba Y, Abe E, Unoki E, Musha Y, Ito K, Katoh S, Yamaguchi T. A Diagnostic Scoring System for Sacroiliac Joint Pain Originating from the Posterior Ligament.Pain Med. 2016 Jun 10. pii: pnw117. [Epub ahead of print]
  4. Butt AM, Gill C, Demerdash A, Watanabe K, Loukas M, Rozzelle CJ, Tubbs RS. A comprehensive review of the sub-axial ligaments of the vertebral column: part I anatomy and function. Childs Nerv Syst. 2015 May 1. [Epub ahead of print]

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