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Omega-3 May Reduce Gum Disease

November 2010

Omega-3 fatty acid intake is inversely associated with periodontitis in the U.S. population, according to research published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

The new study found that a moderate dietary intake of the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) were associated with a decreased prevalence of periodontitis of up to 20 percent.

Taking Omega 3’s is less expensive than taking drugs and safer for the prevention and treatment of periodontitis.

Periodontitis is a common, chronic inflammatory disease that is characterized by gum tissue separation from the tooth—forming a periodontal pocket that can lead to bone and tooth loss.

Traditional therapies for periodontitis focus on targeting the initial bacterial infection, however more recent therapeutic strategies have aimed to target the response to the infection, which is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

A study published earlier this year in Molecular Oral Microbiology did report potential anti-bacterial effects, extending the benefits beyond inflammation.

Researchers from the University of Kentucky reported that EPA, DHA and LNA (alpha-linolenic acid), as well as their fatty acid ethyl esters, could inhibit the growth of oral pathogens, including Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans and Porphyromonas ginigvalis at relatively low doses.

The study was said to be the first to demonstrate an antibacterial activity of omega-3 fatty acids and their esters against oral pathogens.

Journal of the American Dietetic Association 110(11):1669-1675, 2010

Dr. Tucker recommends EPA-DHA 720 by Metagenics.  Order  www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com

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