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Insufficient ALA Could Be Linked to Obesity

A new study, published in the Journal of Lipid Research, describes an increase in fat mass of mice over several generations when fed an “unbalanced western diet.” The authors suggest a deficiency in alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3) coupled with a chronic excess of linoleic acid (omega-6) could lead to “inherited obesity.”

In addition to weight gain,  insulin resistance and the expression of the inflammatory genes may be involved.

“Collectively, our data show that continuous exposure to a high-fat diet combined with a high LA:LNA (omega-6:omega-3) ratio over generations triggers a discrete and steady increase in inflammatory stimuli, accompanied by enhancement of fat mass,” the researchers wrote.

How many times have you heard me say take your fish oils?  Low amounts of omega 3’s  may have serious long-term effects on health.

During the last 40 years we had seen an increase of over 250% in levels of omega-6 intake and a fall in levels of omega-3 of 40%. This change in diet has coincided with a steady rise in obesity levels through the generations.

We may be out of balance between the good omega 3’s to the not as good omega 6’s by as much as 40-to-1 in the United States.

Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) omega-3 is an essential fatty acid that the body cannot make and therefore must be consumed in the diet. Good sources of ALA include: flaxseed, soybeans, walnuts and olive oil. 

I recommend ALAMax CR by XYMOGEN  (order by calling 1-800-647-6100 use PIN # TUC500.) I also recommend OmegaPure 780 fish oils by XYMOGEN

An unbalanced diet can lead to changes in the expression of genes that control growth and immune factions.

Journal of Lipid Research 51(8):2352-2361, 2010

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