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Posture Evaluations Article

This is Part 1 in a series of posture articles I am writing for Dynamic Chiropractic this year. Enjoy!

http://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=54530

My At-Home 10-Week Conditioning and Fat-Loss Program

http://www.toyourhealth.com/mpacms/tyh/article.php?id=1277

Posture Evaluation Part 1 Article By Dr. Tucker

http://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=54530

It Starts With The Core

The core is the center of the body, where all movement begins. When you lift a heavy grocery bag, reach for a suitcase, pick up one of your children, move a bookcase or throw a ball, the core muscles should activate even before your limbs are in motion. Healthy core muscles will provide your body with the structural integrity and support to your spine for everything from walking and running to lifting to standing to sitting.

During most activities, do you feel that the way you are using your body is efficient and coordinated or inefficient and uncoordinated? The core should work in an efficient and coordinated fashion to maintain correct alignment of the spine and pelvis while the limbs are moving. As you move your arms and legs, the core muscles create a solid base of support to hold the spine still. If you feel uncoordinated and have a weak core, you are susceptible to lower back pain, poor posture and a whole host of muscle injuries. Strong core muscles act as a “brace” or support to help prevent pain and injury. Strong core muscles increase the recruitment efficiency of the smaller, deeper “stabilizing” muscles around the abdominals, low back, hips and pelvis. They protect your back from potential injury. Strengthening weak core muscles can reduce existing back pain problems. Core training will help runners avoid hamstring and knee injuries; gymnasts, soccer, football and rugby players avoid groin injuries; dancers, golfers and weight-lifters avoid back injuries; and help you become stronger, fitter and healthier.

Read More… http://www.toyourhealth.com/mpacms/tyh/article.php?id=1251&pagenumber=1

Ankle Injury Article

Ankle sprains can easily get reinjured – which is especially common during the first year – and this can result in chronic pain or disability. My article offers a home–based proprioceptive training program shown to significantly reduce the risk of recurrent ankle sprain.

California Chiropractic Journal article and photos:

http://www.ccajournal.com/CCA_Spring_Journal.pdf

Weight-Loss Rules that Work

Here are the suggestions I hear myself telling clients about weight loss advice everyday.

Don’t worry about fat, carbs are the culprit. Limit carbs to 100-150 grams per day. Get your Protein intake up to 100 grams a day for women and 120 grams for men. This number varies but I can be more exact if I can perform a Body Fat Analysis on you.

I generally see better results with a low-carbohydrate plan. You still have to eat fewer calories than you burn if you want to lose weight. So the truth is, the perfect weight-loss diet is the one you can live with, whether you cut fat, carbs, or some combination.

Just don’t cut protein. Protein-rich foods make you feel fuller. Snacks between meals are advised and should include protein. The most important meal is breakfast. In my opinion, the best food for breakfast is a whey (rice protein or soy protein is my second choice) protein shake. A daily breakfast shake made with two scoops of UltraMeal whey protein powder, a little fruit (fresh or frozen berries or a banana), and water or crushed ice will help you lose fat (not muscle). You can buy UltraMeal whey protein powder at my Metagenics link. Some clients have two or three shakes a day instead of lousy fast food meals.

Animal proteins are fine. I encourage eggs. I am an ex-vegetarian and have been on both sides of the camp. Protein from animals increases thermogenesis more than vegetable proteins, so the best calorie-burning foods are lean meats. So eat some protein at each meal—build your dinner around lean chicken, beef, or pork. That way, you’re burning the most calories through digestion at the end of the day, when your metabolism is slower.

Not only is it Ok to eat lots of meat, but dairy products as well.

Restrict fructose-sweetened beverages and breads. Breads are just not going to work. A few are OK but you’ll have to email me separately for those name brands.

Restrict potato chips and french fries.

Include a lot of vege’s. Vege’s are fiber’s and when you have fiber in your stomach, food takes longer to enter the bloodstream, and your blood-sugar level stays steady. The benefits: You’ll have a more consistent energy supply and less between-meal hunger. Broccoli, cauliflower, kale, Brussel Sprouts, tomato, and salads are great examples. Eat lots of these with eat main meals and as a snack.

Use Olive oil (which contains a cancer-fighting fat called beta-sitosterol) for dressings. I love to cook with coconut oil.

You’ll need to take omega-3 polyunsaturated fats, which are found in fish, nuts, seeds, flaxseed and fish oils. (supplement with EPA-DHA 720, available at my Metagenics link).
Omega-3 fats reduce inflammation throughout your body. That not only prevents heart attacks (inflammation in the tissues surrounding blood vessels is a major cause) but also helps your muscles recover faster from workouts I’ll be teaching you. If you don’t eat fish twice a week and can’t stomach fish-oil supplements, try eggs high in omega-3s, which are found in the dairy case, next to the regular eggs. You can eat 3-4 of them a day without any negative effect on your cholesterol levels.

You must keep a food diary. The more honest you are, and the more detailed it is, the better. You can’t wing it and expect to see results.

The best plan is likely to include these elements:

• Meals and snacks are based on some lean protein source—fish, eggs, dairy, meat.

• More meals are better than fewer. Five or six meals and snacks a day is ideal.

• Low-fat and high-fat diets can both work, but one that cuts almost all fat is doomed.

• Eat— no more than 2 per day of fruits, eat lots of vegetables, and a minimal amount of whole grains, nuts and seeds. Avoid potatoes (except Yukon gold & yams), pasta, rice, popcorn, and white bread.

Q. When do you ice an injury and when do you heat it?

An acute injury should always be iced, never heated, whether it?s a muscle strain, a twisted ankle, or pain around a joint. The ice will constrict blood flow in surrounding blood vessels, which reduces swelling at the injury site. The cold will also help to dampen pain. Apply an ice pack for 15 to 20 minutes, about four times daily. Always use ice after a physical activity rather than before.

Commercial ice packs work well, including disposable packs that rely on a chemical reaction for instant cooling, or cold gel packs that can be kept in the freezer and reused. But a homemade ice pack will do the job equally well. A bag of frozen peas works well.

After a few days of icing, applying moist heat to help with the healing process for as long as needed. It reduces stiffness that occurs around an injury site and increases blood flow to healing muscles and joints.
Avoid heat until three to five days after an injury. I prefer a moist heating pad. Heating pads can be left on an injury for 15 or 20 minutes at a time; don?t leave a heating pad on the site while sleeping. Heat can also be helpful for chronic injuries, particularly before an activity, to loosen muscles and increase mobility.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a serious and debilitating condition. Is there a solution for those who are unlucky enough to suffer from CFS to get well again?

Some people feel flu-like symptoms, dizziness, “brain fog”, poor concentration, headaches and most of all, severely exhausted and completely drained. Literally weeks and months of this severely exhaustion can go by.

My experiences with numerous patients who suffer with CFS, has led me to a supplement called Mitichondrial Renewal Kit by XYMOGEN. The Mitochondrial Renewal Kit helps to improve insulin sensitivity and action; improve glucose transport; increase Nitric Oxide production; improve cardiovascular function; improve appetite control; reduce fat mass; increase muscle mass; improve movement ability; improve antioxidant status.

The experience of working with CFS has taught me that nutrition actually plays a key role in helping people feel better. It’s not about beating CFS – it’s about working with it to attain better health. CFS treatment requires intense hands on participation from your Doctor and you! My advice to all patients with CFS is to work with a Doctor who can help you fine tune your nutritional needs!

Forward Head Posture Article written by Dr. Tucker

http://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=54719

Dr. Tucker interview on balance training

http://www.chiroeco.com/videos/videos_parker_lasvegas_2010_view.php?video=16

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